DNTO

Where did your bicycle take you?

Strap on your helmet, roll up your pant legs, and get back on the saddle! For the first episode of this brand new season, DNTO is taking a look at our trusty two-wheeled friends.

DNTO Sept. 6 / 16

<a href='http://www.mollycrealock.com'>Molly Crealock</a> via <a href='http://www.dandyhorsemagazine.com'>Dandyhorse Magazine</a>

[Originally aired September 6, 2014]

Strap on your helmet, roll up your pant legs, and get back on the saddle! For this epidose, DNTO is taking a look at our trusty two-wheeled friends.
 
Bicycles get us to work, they take us home again, and can carry us all around the world - with nothing but the power of our pedalling. So from training wheels to trail races: where did your bicycle take you?  
 
Host Sook-Yin Lee cycles to work every day, and seriously loves her trusty old bikes. In this video, our pedal-powered host gives you a tour of her wheels. 

On this week's show:

Last year Mac Hollan and two friends went on a massive charity bike ride. They set out from Northern Idaho, through Alberta and the Yukon, and headed to the Arctic Ocean. Mac was an experienced cyclist and had done lots of long-distance bike trips, but nothing could have prepared him for what happened on this one... (Photo Courtesy: Becky Woltjer) 
 
Super-cyclist Clara Hughes has no end of stories from the road. The six-time Olympic champ shares a few of the most memorable moments from her summer of cycling, including her epic Big Ride all over Canada. A few of her stories had Sook-Yin in tears, so you may want to have a tissue handy when you listen.
 
When many immigrants come to Canada, they don't know how to ride a bike. Montreal's Papa Amadou Toure is taking care of that problem with his cycling school, Velocaravane. Sook-Yin gets cycling tips from Papa Amadou and one of his newest students, Alice Gomis.
 
When David Newland and Meghan Sheffield got married they wanted to be able to ride their bikes together, despite the differences in their ability and speed. They thought a tandem bike would be the perfect compromise. But it turns out that a bicycle built for two required much more compromise than either of them thought.
 
Bike accidents, both large and small, can have a big impact. But what happens when you're unable to move past a crash? Writer David Hayes explains how, even after his bones had healed, he was unable to ride his bike - and shares the surprising method he used to get himself back on the saddle. 
 
A few years ago, Holly Moore was walking down the street in New York and found the bike of her dreams. A man was selling a set of adorable wheels for $40 dollars - a deal that was too good for Holly to pass up. So why did their relationship only last five minutes? 
 
Rob Callard has always loved the feeling of jumping on a bike and seeing where the road takes him. But he never imagined that one day, cycling would save his life - and help him bike away from cancer.
 
Finding a place to lock up your bicycle can be tough - but Judith Pyke thought she had found a great spot. It was so close to her office that she could see it right outside her window! So she parked there for years, until one fateful day, when hundreds of teenagers got between her and her two-wheeled steed.
 
Thom Bargen is a coffee shop in Winnipeg's West Broadway neighbourhood. You'll find young people chatting, seated at wooden countertops, And in the corner, an inexplicable blue bicycle hanging on the wall... Owners TJ Hiebert and Graham Bargen tell the story behind the bicycle shrine.
 
Have your ever ridden your bike in the dark? Or closed your eyes while you were on your bike? in Winnipeg,  Jean-Frederic Nazon rides his bike year round. The catch? He's legally blind.
 
This week's playlist:
Alvvays - Adult Diversion
Abdominal - Pedal Pusher
Hey Ocean - Bicycle 
Hawksley Workman- (The Happiest Day I Know Is A) Tokyo Bicycle
Barry White - You're The First, My Last, My Everything
Slow Leaves- Life of a Better Man
Stars- No One Is Lost
Union Duke - Bike Song
Cold Specks- Bodies at Bay

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