DNTO

What unexpected places did a cab ride take you?

We're trying something a little different on the show this week. Every single story is set in the same place. It's a cozy space that's intimate and constantly in motion. Whether you're the driver or the passenger, today on DNTO we're asking: What unexpected places did a cab ride take YOU?

DNTO Mar. 15 / 25

Listen to the full episode1:07:54
We're trying something a little different on the show this week.

Every single story is set in the same place. It's a cozy space that's intimate and constantly in motion.

Whether you're the driver or the passenger, today on DNTO we're asking: 
What unexpected places did a cab ride take YOU?
On this week's show:

joe_cobden200.jpg
Joe Cobden is an actor who got a big break when he was cast in Hollywood movie being filmed in Montreal. 

Only problem? Nothing was going to stop Joe from going to his friend's wedding in Halifax, even if it was during filming! 

So when a hurricane trapped Joe in Halifax hundreds of kilometres away from set, he was in big trouble... That's when Ahmed, a taxi driver, stepped in to save the day. 









london taxi200.jpg
What do you get when you put three drunken British university students inside an iconic London black cab? A scheme to break the world's record for the highest taxi fare ever. 

Johno Ellison talks to us about travelling with his buddies, Paul Archer and Leigh Purnell, for 15 months inside a taxi to visit 50 countries. 


Sook-Yin heads to a line of cars to ask cabbies to share stories of their most memorable passengers.


Anne Marie Anonsen car.jpg

Anne Marie Anonsen is a straight-talkin', 63-year old grandmother in St. John's, Newfoundland who loves her job driving a cab. She explains how she secretly gets revenge on cheap customers. 











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25 years ago, Kent Nerburn was a student and sculptor living in Minneapolis.

To earn a little extra money, he started working as a taxi driver on the overnight shift. 

One late August night, Kent got a call from the dispatcher to pick up a woman in a sketchy part of town. And that turned into a cab ride he would never forget.


Jagdeep Grewal 200.jpg
Jagdeep Grewal is one of the few female taxi drivers in Vancouver.

She's loved driving since she was 8 years old, 
when she learned how to drive a tractor on her grandpa's farm in India.

But when she immigrated to Canada, her life changed dramatically. Her new husband expected her to do kitchen work and raise their three young children,
and nothing else. 

But Jagdeep never let go of her dream to be a driver.....



Krystalle Ramlakhan and Claude Aube 200.jpgOne of the most unique cab cultures in all of Canada can be found in Iqaluit, a city where the flat fare is always six bucks, no matter how far you have to go. 

And depending how many other passengers are sharing the back seat, your ride might take you a lot further than you expect. CBC North reporter Krystalle Ramlakhan introduces you to Iqaluit's longest-serving cabbie, Claude Aube.


Sarah Mian 200.jpg

When Sarah Mian was 13 years old and waiting for the bus, a taxi cab driver offered to drive her home for free. She happily got in, until she realized that this was not a real taxi cab, nor a real taxi driver. 

She now  works as an exhibit custodian in a crime lab and is writing her first novel, When the Saints, which will be published by HarperCollins in 2015. Sarah lives in Queensland, Nova Scotia.







Mike Heffernan200.jpg
Mike Heffernan is a historical researcher in St. John's Newfoundland who collects oral histories of working-class Canadians.

A few years ago, Mike dove into the world of St. John's taxi drivers. Over three years he met, spoke to, and rode with cabbies, getting rare access into their secret lives and work. He gathered their stories into a book, The Other Side of Midnight: Taxicab Stories




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