What to consider when uploading videos of police violence

What do you do if you capture an incident of police violence on your phone? Brent talks to Ramsey Orta — the man behind the infamous video of Eric Garner's deadly confrontation with New York City police — and Jackie Zammuto of Witness about how sharing a video of police violence can change your life and what to consider before you hit 'upload.'
A bystander records a Chicago protest march on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (The Associated Press)
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This week in Toronto, Const. James Forcillo was found guilty of attempted murder in the shooting death of Sammy Yatim. Some believe a bystander video uploaded on-line helped convict the officer. In fact, Forcillo's lawyer called it a "trial by YouTube." From Yatim to Eric Garner, Walter Scott, Freddie Gray and others, bystander videos are increasingly becoming key evidence in police abuse cases — sometimes at a cost to the bystander. 

What do you do if you capture an incident of police violence on your phone? How do you protect yourself, and the privacy of the victim, or their family? Brent speaks to Ramsey Orta, the witness who filmed and uploaded the video of Eric Garner's deadly confrontation with police in New York.

We also talk to Jackie Zammuto of Witness, an organization that trains people globally in the use of video to expose human rights abuses, about what to consider when you decide to share a video of police violence. Click here for a link to more of Jackie's advice on Witness' website.