Day 6

Selfies and belly shirts: Kambiz Hosseini on Iran's World Cup bid

Iran represented by their national team, Team Melli, is one of 31 countries in World Cup this year. And while they've been called one of the weakest teams at the tournament, Team Melli's still worth following. Iranian political satirist Kambiz Hosseini returns to Day 6 to dissect some of the most intriguing stories behind Iran's World Cup bid....
Nigeria's Kunle Odunlami, left, and Iran's Reza Ghoochannejhad challenge for the ball during the group F World Cup soccer match in Curitiba, Brazil, on June 16, 2014. (Michael Sohn/Associated Press)

Iran represented by their national team, Team Melli, is one of 31 countries in the World Cup this year. And while they've been called one of the weakest teams at the tournament, Team Melli's still worth following. Iranian political satirist Kambiz Hosseini returns to Day 6 to dissect some of the most intriguing stories behind Iran's World Cup bid.

Highlight Reel: Iran at the World Cup

Rouhani's Selfie

Iran's first match against Nigeria at the 2014 World Cup ended in a goalless draw, but was still celebrated by Iranians around the world. Perhaps most notably by Iranian president Hassan Rouhani, who tweeted this picture of himself watching the match.

Team Melli's Jerseys

Iran's World Cup jersey is red and white, featuring an Asiatic cheetah. There was some controversy surrounding with the jerseys, with reports that the team had complained about the quality of their shirts.   

The American on Iran's Bench

Iran goalkeepers coach Dan Gaspar works with goalies at the Corinthians soccer team training center in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 8, 2014. (Julio Cortez/Associated Press)

Though the countries are historically known as sworn enemies, there's an American on Iran's bench at the the 2014 Cup. Iran's goal-keeping coach Dan Gaspar is from Connecticut.

Kambiz on an Iranian news site?

As discussed with Brent, satirist Kambiz Hosseini believes an Iranian news agency accidentally posted a photo of him celebrating the World Cup in Brazil.

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