Day 6

Excavating ET

In 1982, Atari rushed out a video game based on the blockbuster, E.T. The Extraterrestrial.  It would soon be described as the most "unplayable" video game ever made and blamed for the destruction of both Atari and the early gaming industry. An urban legend sprang up around this massive commercial failure, based on rumours that Atari buried millions of unsold...
In 1982, Atari rushed out a video game based on the blockbuster, E.T. The Extraterrestrial.  It would soon be described as the most "unplayable" video game ever made and blamed for the destruction of both Atari and the early gaming industry. An urban legend sprang up around this massive commercial failure, based on rumours that Atari buried millions of unsold cartridges in the New Mexico desert. Now, some filmmakers from Ottawa have been given permission to dig in  the closed landfill site where the games are said to be encased in cement. They plan to make a documentary of their quest for the truth behind the myth. Howard Scott Warshaw never believed the rumours. He designed the ET game for Atari and chats with Brent about what it's like to be the man behind one of the most infamous video games in history. 



This is what the game looked like back in the day: 


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