Day 6

Montreal police lay charge in Instagram "harassment" case

A week after our story on the conflict between police and protestors over social media postings of Montreal officers photographs and personal info, police have arrested and charged a woman for a photo she posted on Instagram.  Montreal resident Jennifer Pawluck was arrested for posting a picture she took of an image depicting Montreal Police media spokesperson Commandant Ian Lafrenière....
A week after our story on the conflict between police and protestors over social media postings of Montreal officers photographs and personal info, police have arrested and charged a woman for a photo she posted on Instagram.   Montreal resident Jennifer Pawluck was arrested for posting a picture she took of an image depicting Montreal Police media spokesperson Commandant Ian Lafrenière. The image is of graffiti showing a man with a bullet hole through his forehead. Lafrenière name is scrawled next to it. Pawluck is being accused of criminal harassment and will appear in court later this month. Although Pawluck is a supporter of the student protest movement she says she didn't know who Lafrenière was when she made the post.

Last week's related story drew plenty of reaction from listeners. Some, like blog commenter "mewithanopinion", sympathize with protesters about the value of holding police officers accountable by making their identities known online:
It is clear that a public photographic record of all police linked to their names and badge number is needed. Before police will act on a complaint they claim that the officer must be identified before they can proceed. After the G20 in Toronto and many complaints of police misconduct the police were 'unable' to identify police who were photographed assaulting protesters. In a few cases they were identified by the public after the police failed to recognize their own employees. Other police officers concealed their names and badge numbers and refused to identify themselves when asked. A public photographic record with badge numbers and names will help address this issue.

And Greg Blanchette (@grgblee) tweets:  

But "Westerner51" sees Katie Nelson's argument as unfair, and wrote on our blog: 


And on Facebook. Tammy Groff says: 


Other listeners feel there's a limit to what's acceptable for protesters to post online. On Facebook, Samuel Dragon says: 


As always, thanks for all your feedback.

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