Day 6with Brent Bambury

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EPISODE 502

Bolsonaro and COVID-19, racist sports team names, U.K. pubs' pandemic plans, Walter Mercado and more

How Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro’s positive COVID-19 test could mark the beginning of the end for his administration, corporate sponsors push sports teams to change their racist names, Becky Toyne on Jim Carrey’s new book, the unique measures pubs in England are taking to stay safe and open, the life of Walter Mercado and more.
Q&A

Testing positive for COVID-19 won't change Bolsonaro's pandemic response, says analyst

Political analyst Robert Muggah says Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro's positive COVID-19 test may spell the beginning of the end for his administration — even though he doesn't appear to be changing his approach to the pandemic.

Could corporate sponsors force Edmonton's CFL team to change its name?

Following a re-mobilization of the Black Lives Matter movement, sports teams with names depicting Indigenous people face a reckoning — and corporate sponsors have joined the fight.

New novel co-written by Jim Carrey is bound to be a bestseller. But should you read it?

Canadian actor Jim Carrey has co-authored Memoirs and Misinformation: A Novel with Dana Vachon. The semi-autobiographical book can be funny, interesting and touching. But should you read it? Day 6 books columnist Becky Toyne gives us her verdict.

Bumpy ride for U.K. pubs reopening as pandemic restrictions lift

After shutting doors for several months in keeping with public health measures, several establishments have had to close within days of getting the green-light to allow customers in their doors again.

Netflix doc Mucho Mucho Amor sheds light on Walter Mercado, Latin America's horoscope superstar

Co-director Cristina Costantini describes meeting the beloved Puerto Rican TV astrologer whose flamboyant and mercurial personality was beloved by millions of Latin Americans since the 1970s.

Out on Television: Wilson Cruz on the rise of LGBTQ roles in Hollywood

Wilson Cruz made history as the first openly gay actor to play a gay teen on primetime television in his role on My So-Called Life. Now, he's one of the executive producers of Visible: Out on Television, a docuseries that traces the highs and lows of LGBTQ representation on TV.

Riffed from the Headlines: 07/11/2020

Riffed from the Headlines is our weekly quiz where we choose three riffs linked by one story in the news. Guess the story that links the riffs and you could win a Day 6 tote bag.
Episode 501

Backlash against masks, the future of Hong Kong protest, empty stadiums, Canada's migrant workers and more

Why some people are refusing to mask up during COVID-19, China's new security laws and the future of Hong Kong's protest movement, the longstanding problems with Canada's migrant worker program, how going crowdless changes the game for professional sports teams, Canadian Clayton Theriault raises disability awareness and more.

How psychology can explain pushback against mandatory masks

As governments try to clamp down on the spread of COVID-19, mandatory mask laws are becoming more common — and that has a vocal minority pushing back in a phenomenon best explained by psychology, says Dr. Steven Taylor.

Facing new security bill, protesters in Hong Kong plan to use the region's financial power against China

Hong Kong-based journalist Mary Hui says pro-democracy demonstrators are considering a plan to target China by inflicting economic pain. She says many younger protesters are no longer interested in working within the "one country, two systems" framework.

With cardboard spectators and fake cheers, sports leagues aim to make games 'normal' during the pandemic

As sports leagues gear up to play despite the COVID-19 pandemic, fans won't be allowed in the stands — but that hasn't stopped some teams from making the experience as authentic as possible with the sounds of artificial spectators and cardboard cutouts of real-life fans.
Listen

Amid COVID-19 outbreaks, researcher says Canada's migrant worker program was flawed from the start

Hundreds have been infected and three migrant workers in Canada have died after contracting COVID-19, prompting some advocates in Ontario to call this week for a shutdown of the entire agricultural sector. Researcher Jenna Hennebry says the COVID-19 outbreaks are exposing deep flaws and racism baked into Canada's Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program.

'I can definitely speak for myself': Canadian interview series raises awareness about disabled community

Oakville, Ont.-based blogger Clayton Theriault, who lives with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, launched Hot Seat with Cognizant Clay, a video series on YouTube that aims to open up the conversation around disability during the pandemic.

Who is Ghislaine Maxwell, the woman accused of procuring young girls for Jeffery Epstein?

The one-time girlfriend of Jeffery Epstein is accused of running his sex trafficking operation. She's a mysterious figure who introduced Epstein to New York's rich and famous.

Riffed from the Headlines: 07/04/2020

Riffed from the Headlines is our weekly quiz where we choose three riffs linked by one story in the news. Guess the story that links the riffs and you could win a Day 6 tote bag.
Episode 500

Policing and mental health reform, K-pop fans get political, Bill Browder on Putin, Summer Reads and more

Challenging systemic racism in Canada's mental health institutions,  K-pop fans get political, Bill Browder on Putin's push for permanent power, Becky Toyne's Summer Reads list for 2020, how COVID-19 sparked a bike industry boom and more.

Systemic racism must be rooted out of mental health services, too — not just police, says advocate

Canada's largest mental health hospital has called for an end to police involvement in mental health checks. But Aseefa Sarang says mental health care must root out its own problems with systemic racism, as well.

Will the new bike boom last post-pandemic? Look to the '70s for clues, says writer

Carlton Reid sees echoes of the 1970s American bike boom today, as demand for bicycles has skyrocketed thanks in part to concerns about crowded public transit and carpools during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Q&A

K-pop fans know how to mobilize online, and they're now getting political

CedarBough Saeji, a scholar in contemporary Korean culture, says we shouldn't be surprised that teenage fans of Korean pop music took responsibility for trolling U.S. President Donald Trump's latest campaign rally.
Q&A

By this time next week, Vladimir Putin will probably be president for life, says Bill Browder

This week Russians are voting on proposed changes to the country’s constitution which, among other things, would allow Vladimir Putin to remain in office until 2036. The opposition has been calling this week's referendum a constitutional coup. Bill Browder calls it business as usual.

Summer reads: Becky Toyne's reading recommendations to see you through your summer staycation

This summer may be a little different than summers past, but whether you're sticking to your backyard, heading to a cottage, or staying on your couch, Day 6 books columnist Becky Toyne has her annual list of great and timely summer reads.

Riffed from the Headlines: 06/27/2020

Riffed from the Headlines is our weekly quiz where we choose three riffs linked by one story in the news. Guess the story that links the riffs and you could win a Day 6 tote bag and a personalized note from our very own Brent Bambury.
Episode 499

Bolton's book, opening long-term care centres, Gone With The Wind, Wind of Change, Aimee Stephens and more

John Bolton's scathing new book about Donald Trump, excitement and worry as visitors return to Ontario long-term care homes, re-thinking Gone With The Wind, how drive-in theatres are coping with COVID-19, Wind of Change asks if the CIA wrote a power ballad to help end the Cold War, Aimee Stephens's victory for LGBTQ rights and more.
LISTEN

No one should buy John Bolton's book — but everyone should read it, says Dahlia Lithwick

Cozying up to dictators. Asking China to help his re-election efforts. Asking whether Finland was a part of Russia. Slate senior editor Dahlia Lithwick assesses the bombshell stories and allegations against U.S. President Donald Trump made in John Bolton’s new memoir The Room Where It Happened.

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