Cost of Living·Full Episode

You've got questions? We've got answers! From ice cream to eye cream to zero-growth economics

We're kicking off the summer by answering another batch of listener queries about money. From the small to the large — like why does a tiny bottle of eye cream cost so much more than other face creams? Or why do economies need to keep growing?

The Cost of Living team answers your questions: Summer 2021 edition

This week the Cost of Living answers listeners questions. From ice cream to eye cream, zero growth economics to banks paying your bills. Our producers get to the bottom of your queries. (Kite_rin/Shutterstock, Atstock Productions/Shutterstock, Phongphan/Shutterstock, fascinadora/stock.adobe.com)
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You've got questions? We've got answers!

We're kicking off the summer on the Cost of Living by answering another batch of listener queries about money.


Madhia Chowdury dropped us a line from Calgary asking why two fancy ice cream stores would set up shop in the same neighbourhood — both offering similar frozen treats.

Senior producer Jennifer Keene got the scoop with a visit to both shops, and then talked competition with Tom Cooper, professor of strategy in the faculty of business administration at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Christina Silva in Edmonton asked "why are eye creams so expensive relative to other basic moisturizers?"

Producer Tracy Fuller read between the fine lines for an answer that's one part ingredients to five parts marketing. 

Dan Kramer from Allenford, Ontario asked "Why do economies have to grow? … explain the concept of the zero growth economy and its pros and cons."

Host Paul Haavardsrud talked zero-growth with Peter Victor, a professor emeritus in environmental studies at York University and author of "Managing Without Growth: Slower by Design, Not Disaster."

Wayne Horner from St. Thomas, Ontario, called us with a question about everyday banking transactions.

Why, in today's age of instant payments and transfers, does it take banks multiple business days to process bill payments?

Producer Anis Heydari delved into the world of Canada's automated clearing settlement system with Janet Lalonde, senior director at Payments Canada. 

Subscribe to the Cost of Living podcast or download the CBC Listen app to hear the whole show.

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