Cost of Living·LISTEN

Why nobody really gets in trouble when real estate predictions miss the mark

Why are projections about the housing market wrong so often? We gaze into the crystal ball to find out the consequences of getting a housing market forecast wrong.
Housing prices in many areas have gone up, despite predictions of a drop from many market watchers. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

Why are projections about the housing market wrong so often?

  • The Cost of Living ❤s money — how it makes (or breaks) us.
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Predicting the Canadian real estate market is as common as arguing about the weather forecast. But what happens when those guesses are wrong? Do we get soaked or roasted?

Cost of Living producer Anis Heydari gazes into the crystal ball and finds out the consequences of getting a housing market forecast wrong.


Click "listen" at the top of the page to hear this segment, or download the Cost of Living podcast

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