Cost of Living·LISTEN

How pipelines went from engineering marvel to project non grata

Engineering projects once seen as monuments to human ingenuity are now lightning rods for climate change and a symbol of environmental catastrophe. So what's changed in public perception and why?
Back in 2017, opponents of the Keystone XL pipeline are pictured demonstrating in Nebraska. The vibe towards pipelines in 1957, though, may have been a bit different. (Nati Harnik/The Canadian Press)

Engineering projects once seen as monuments to human ingenuity are now lightning rods for climate change and a symbol of environmental catastrophe.

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Pipelines, including the recently re-cancelled Keystone XL, are controversial for many in North America. But it wasn't always that way.

Producer Anis Heydari takes to the wayback machine to see what's changed in public perception and why.


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