Cost of Living

Think your neighbour's cheating on CERB? There's a snitch line for that.

The Canada Revenue Agency has opened its leads line to tips about people taking advantage of the Canada Emergency Relief Benefit. But what's the psychology behind reporting on potential cheaters in your orbit?

The Canada Revenue Agency wants you to tattle on people cheating the Canada Emergency Relief Benefit

The Canada Revenue Agency's leads program is now accepting reports on people suspected of cheating the Canada Emergency Relief Benefit. (Tracy Fuller/CBC)

The Canada Emergency Response benefit has been a lifesaver for millions of Canadians. Federal money came fast, and many found there were very few hoops to jump through in order to qualify.

But with the money easier to access and more generous, in some respects, than standard Employment Insurance — there were questions about potentially fraudulent claims. Would someone need to tattletale, so to speak, on those potentially cheating the system, for them to get caught?

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Cost of Living producer Richard Raycraft takes a closer look at the Canada Revenue Agency's "snitch line," which is now accepting tips to track down alleged CERB charlatans. What's the psychology behind snitching?


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