Cross Country Checkup

What should be the role of Canada's modern correctional system — to punish or to rehabilitate?

The killer of Tori Stafford has moved from a prison to a healing lodge, and now her family is outraged. This week on Checkup, join host Duncan McCue to discuss what role Canada should play when it comes to its correctional system.

How should Corrections Canada balance incarceration with attempts at rehabilitation?

Terri-Lynne McClintic, convicted killer of Tori Stafford, has transferred from a prison to a minimum-security healing lodge.

Terri-Lynne McClintic is serving a life sentence for the gruesome murder of eight-year-old Tori Stafford in 2009. The young girl was abducted from Woodstock, Ontario on her way home from school by McClintic and her boyfriend. They sexually assaulted and killed her, burying her body over 100 km away. It took months to find the girl's remains. 

Now, eight years into her sentence, we learn McClintic has been relocated from a medium-security prison to the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge, which is designed to rehabilitate offenders and has no fences.

Tori Stafford's family is outraged by the transfer. The government has ordered a review, but the Conservative Party will force a vote next week demanding the decision be condemned. 

How should Corrections Canada balance incarceration with attempts at rehabilitation? Are there some offenders whose crimes are so heinous they should be shown no mercy?

Our question today: What should be the role of Canada's modern correctional system — to punish or to rehabilitate?

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