What concerns you most about concussions in sports?

The NHL this week reached a tentative deal with more than 300 players who have suffered concussions — without acknowledging liability.

The NHL this week reached a tentative deal with more than 300 players who have suffered concussions

The effects of concussions, particularly on youth and children, can last for decades. (Shutterstock)
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It used to be known as "getting your bell rung."

After a violent whack to the head a player got a whiff of smelling salts and got back on the ice or playing field.

Even though a lot more is known about concussions these days, they remain a growing concern for athletes, coaches and parents in both professional, and recreational sports.

The impacts, particularly on youth and children, can last for decades, affecting the day-to-day lives of those who have them.

After four years of legal tug-of-war, the National Hockey League reached a tentative concussion deal of almost $19 million US, with more than 300 retired players — without acknowledging any liability.

The NHL promises to pay out millions of dollars though it stick-handled around liability. The question is will the settlement make hockey players any safer?

We'd like to know what you think.

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