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What are your thoughts on the Fort McMurray wildfire?

A routine forest fire, the wind shifts, and suddenly terrified inhabitants are fleeing through apocalyptic walls of flame, pillars of smoke and flying cinders. What will it take to recover? What are your thoughts? With host, Duncan McCue.
Tyra Abo sits on a cot at a makeshift evacuee center in Lac la Biche, Alberta on May 5, 2016, after fleeing forest fires north of Fort McMurray. (Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images)
Listen to the full episode1:53:00

A routine forest fire, the wind shifts, and suddenly terrified inhabitants are fleeing through apocalyptic walls of flame, pillars of smoke and flying cinders. What will it take to recover? What are your thoughts? With guest host, Duncan McCue.

A routine forest fire, the wind shifts, and suddenly terrified inhabitants are fleeing through apocalyptic walls of flame, pillars of smoke and flying cinders. 

It's a miracle that so many got out of Fort McMurray alive. Close to 90,000 people were evacuated from the area when a wildfire on the edge of the city suddenly shifted direction and jumped across the Athabasca River.

The speed, the ferocity and the unpredictability of the fire caught even the experts by surprise. And many of us watched helplessly from a distance as it played out on screens across the country.

Following the fire and evacuation of Fort McMurray what are your thoughts? And what is it going to take for Fort Mac to recover?

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Guests

Mike Allen is a resident of Fort McMurray, and a former Alberta MLA for Fort McMurray-Wood Buffalo.

Colleen Malone is a senior humanitarian advisor with Save the Children.

Robert Gray is a fire ecologist with R.W. Gray Consulting Ltd. He is based in Chilliwack, British Columbia.

Paul Kovacs is founder and executive director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction at Western University.