Cross Country Checkup·Live Chat

Uber: should it stay or should it go?

Uber. If the debate hasn't come to your city yet … chances are it will sometime soon. Municipalities across the country — and across North America — have been struggling to come to terms with ride-sharing services, and in the process, turned the traditional taxi industry on its head.
The Uber logo is seen in front of protesting taxi drivers who were depositing a request for an injunction against the ride sharing company at the courthouse Tuesday, February 2, 2016 in Montreal. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)
Listen to the full episode1:52:58

Uber. If the debate hasn't come to your city yet … chances are it will sometime soon.

MORE FROM THIS EPISODE

Live Blog | Guests | Links & Articles | Download the MP3

Municipalities across the country — and across North America — have been struggling to come to terms with ride-sharing services, and in the process, turned the traditional taxi industry on its head. 

From Edmonton (which has enthusiastically embraced Uber drivers) to Vancouver (who hasn't), every city seems to have its own strategy. And for the first time, a province has decided to bring some kind of coherence to the patchwork of local regulations. Quebec has tabled legislation which effectively forces ride-sharing operators to face similar regulations to traditional cab drivers.

Our question — Uber: should it stay or should it go?

Live Blog

Guests

Kamal Sabbah is vice-president of the Montreal Taxi Owners' Association.

Kristine Owram is a tranportation reporter with the Financial Post.

Trevor Tombe is assistant professor of economics at the University of Calgary.

L​inks & Articles

CBC News

National Post

The Globe and Mail

Huffington Post

Ottawa Citizen

Toronto Star

The Province

Maclean's

The Hill Times

The New York Times

Driving