Cross Country Checkup

Should the measles shot be mandatory?

The recent measles outbreak is inflaming the debate over mandatory vaccination. Currently, only Ontario and New Brunswick require proof of immunization for children and adolescents to attend school.

At least 41 cases have been confirmed across Canada so far this year

The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine is typically given to children at 12 months of age. (Eric Risberg/Associated Press)
Listen to the full episode1:52:14

So far this year, at least 41 cases of measles have been confirmed across Canada, hitting Quebec, British Columbia, Ontario, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization says that the number of reported cases around the globe has quadrupled in the first three months of 2019 compared to the same period last year.

The measles outbreak is, once again, stoking the vaccination debate, particularly on social media networks like Twitter and Facebook — two platforms which have struggled to contain the spread of misinformation.

Currently, Ontario and New Brunswick require proof of immunization for children and adolescents to attend school.

Our question this week: Should the measles shot be mandatory?

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