Cross Country Checkup

Has 'cancel culture' gone too far?

In Toronto, hundreds called on the Toronto Public Library to cancel a talk by writer Meghan Murphy Tuesday night. Are boycotts of controversial, offensive or questionable public speakers helping or hurting free speech?

Former U.S. president Barack Obama says call-out culture is threatening real activism

Feminist writer and speaker Meghan Murphy is at the centre of a debate over what constitutes free speech. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Former U.S. president Barack Obama this week rebuked call-out and cancel culture, saying that it undermines real activism, both online and on college campuses.  

Meanwhile, in Toronto, hundreds called on the Toronto Public Library to cancel a talk by writer Meghan Murphy on Tuesday night, echoing protests in Vancouver earlier this year. 

Are boycotts of controversial, offensive or questionable public speakers helping or hurting free speech?

Our question this week: Has "cancel culture" gone too far?

Plus, gynecologist Dr. Jen Gunter, author of The Vagina Bible and host of CBC Gem's Jensplaining, takes your calls.

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