Cross Country Checkup

Does solo living suit you?

Once considered unusual and stigmatizing, going solo is the new norm. Single-person households lead the pack in Canada with the number of Canadians living alone more than doubling in the past 35 years.

Single-person households have doubled over the past three decades

Have you recently decided to go it alone? We want to hear your stories Sunday on Cross Country Checkup. (Dean Drobot/Shutterstock)
Listen to the full episode1:49:30

Solo living. A growing trend. Changing social attitudes.

Once considered unusual and stigmatizing, going solo is the new norm. Single-person households lead the pack in Canada with the number of Canadians living alone more than doubling in the past 35 years.

As living alone has become a lifestyle choice for some, others struggle with the loneliness and depression that come with the unwilling solitude.

Singletons, compared to married couples, are more likely to eat out in cafes or restaurants, take classes, exercise in a gym, and attend public events. It fuels another form of economy.

Our question this week: Does solo living suit you?

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