Cross Country Checkup

Does ISIS pose a threat to Canada and Canadians?

What to do about ISIS: Experts say they've been watching them for months.  But the al-Qaeda splinter-group only recently exploded into the public eye in a blood-drenched grab for power and territory in Iraq. What do you think?  Do you see ISIS as a threat that goes beyond the Middle East? With host Rex Murphy....
  What to do about ISIS: Experts say they've been watching them for months.  But the al-Qaeda splinter-group only recently exploded into the public eye in a blood-drenched grab for power and territory in Iraq. What do you think?  Do you see ISIS as a threat that goes beyond the Middle East?
  With host Rex Murphy.


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Introduction

It has many names: ISIS, ISIL, the Islamic State, or simply the Caliphate. It burst into Western public consciousness this summer with staggering speed and shocking bloodshed. That governments and media organizations still differ on what to call them is testament to the newness of their presence on the world scene ...and to the lack of understanding among those who oppose them.

The speed with which ISIS rocketed to world attention was not only propelled by a combination of military success and brutal ruthlessness, it was also accomplished with a savvy use of media. Many in their ranks are young westerners comfortable with digital media and recruited to join in a bloody battle for fundamentalist ideals. They have proven adept at using all means to get their message and their threats out into public consciousness. The Internet videos of the beheading of two American journalists seemed specially tailored to inflame western sensibilities.

ISIS now has the world's attention ...and that includes Canada, especially as reports indicate there could be as many as several hundred young Canadians working in the ranks. Friday Prime Minister Harper announced Canada would send one-hundred military advisors, special forces, to help the Kurds in northern Iraq fend off ISIS attacks. Foreign Minister John Baird along with opposition members Paul Dewar and Marc Garneau made a suprise visit to Iraq to gain first-hand knowledge of the situation there. We will hear from the minister in a few minutes.

The rise of ISIS is forcing a change in global strategic politics. Former enemies of the US such as Syria, Iran and Russia now have a common purpose in opposing the threat posed by ISIS. Whether they actually act together remains to be seen.

ISIS has vowed to take their fight beyond the borders of the Middle East. That concerns many in the West. The fact that their numbers include citizens of many western nations such as the UK, the US, and Canada means the return of those fighters could come with consequences.

We want to know what you think.

Do you see ISIS as a threat that goes beyond the Middle East? What should the west to to counter the advance of ISIS? Are you disturbed by what you see? What do you think of the fact that there are many young Canadians in their ranks? Should Canada take steps to stop the radicalization of Canadian youth? What measures can be taken to lessen the danger when some of these fighters decide to come home to Canada?

Our question today: "Do you see ISIS as a threat to Canada and Canadians?"

I'm Rex Murphy ...on CBC Radio One ...and on Sirius XM, satellite radio channel 169 ...this is Cross Country Checkup.


Guests

  • John Baird
    Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs
    Twitter: @HonJohnBaird

  • Henry Habib
    Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Political Science, Concordia University.

  • Adrienne Arsenault
    CBC Senior News correspondent for The National
    Twitter: @adriearsenault

  • Imam Syed Soharwardy
    Founder of the Islamic Supreme Council of Canada and Muslims Against Terrorism
    Twitter: @syedsoharwardy



Links

CBC.ca


National Post


Globe and Mail


Winnipeg Free Press


New York Times


The Sunday Times


Council on Foreign Relations


Foreign Policy Blogs


Twitter & E-Mail



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