Cross Country Checkup·Ask Me Anything

What happened when Sharon, Lois & Bram played The Name Game song with Tucker

After 40 years of making music, legendary Canadian children's entertainers Sharon & Bram have plenty of stories to tell. The duo shared some of them while taking calls during an Ask Me Anything segment Sunday on Checkup.

Legendary music duo Sharon & Bram took calls from Checkup listeners

Bram Morrison, left, and Sharon Hampson are better known as the children's entertainers Sharon & Bram. (Jason Vermes/CBC)

Each week, Cross Country Checkup devotes the last half hour to an interview with a high-profile newsmaker, celebrity, thinker or cultural figure who takes calls from listeners.  


After 40 years of making music, iconic Canadian children's entertainers Sharon & Bram have plenty of stories to tell.

The duo shared some of them while taking calls during an Ask Me Anything segment Sunday on Cross Country Checkup.

When Pascal Vipalis called from Hamilton asking them to share a particular memory involving The Name Game song, both singers burst into laughter.

"One of the kids put up his hand and said, 'My name is Tucker,'" recalled Bram Morrison. 

The Name Game song involves the singers rhyming a name with other words.

"Lois got it, and the band and Sharon and Bram were on the floor on the stage. We were dying [of laughter]," added Sharon Hampson.

The possibly unfortunate rhyme didn't immediately occur to their co-star Lois Lilienstein, who died in 2015, but "she fudged it," Hampson added.

"My theory is that the kid's real name was Billy and his father said, 'Tell them your name is Tucker,'" said Morrison.

During the half-hour Ask Me Anything segment, Morrison and Hampson told listeners about everything from their favourite songs to perform with Lilienstein, to getting backlash for starring in a public service announcement about vaccines, and the murky origins of the song Candy Man, Salty Dog.

To hear the full Ask Me Anything segment, download our podcast or click Listen above.

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