Blog·Checkup

Life in Lloydminster and between two time zones

Cindy Trigg joined Checkup guest host Susan McReynolds to discuss the challenges of living in a border town that straddles two provinces--and what the switch to daylight saving time means for her and her colleagues.
It's Saskatchewan versus the world! Or at least North America, which is a hotbed of daylight saving time. The blue indicates areas where daylight saving is observed, while the orange shows those who keep it standard. (Paul Eggert/Wikimedia Commons)

The town of Lloydminster, Alta., straddles the border with its neighbouring province Saskatchewan. This border town phenomenon is usually not a big deal, until daylight saving time ends. Saskatchewan is the only Canadian province that does not observe daylight saving time, but Lloydminster follows Alberta time, which means that for a large portion of the year Saskatchewan slips out of sync with Lloydminster.

Cindy Trigg lives in Lloydminster and works in Saskatchewan. During the winter months, her home is one hour ahead of her workplace. But during daylight saving time, things sync up. It can make things...confusing.

Listen to Trigg describe it in her own words to Checkup guest host, Susan McReynolds.

Cindy Trigg joined Checkup guest host Susan McReynolds to discuss the challenges of living in a border town that straddles two provinces--and what the switch to daylight saving time means for her and her colleagues. 3:50

​Susan McReynolds: Tell me all about Lloydminster. Describe it to me. 

Cindy Trigg: Lloydminster is Canada's only border city. We do, indeed, have the provincial boundary running right through the middle of the city—with Alberta on the west side and Saskatchewan on the east. 

But, Lloydminster itself, we're all in the same Alberta time zone. The Alberta time zone actually extends as far east as Maidstone, Sask. In the city, we're OK with having to do the time change. But I work for a company in Saskatchewan where all of our head offices are located. 

What happens is that when we're on daylight saving, we're on the same time zone—which is great. But when we go back on to standard time, there's an hour's difference. 

So when I go into work at eight o'clock. My co-workers in Saskatchewan have been there since seven o'clock in the morning. Likewise, when they leave work at five o'clock Saskatchewan time, we're still at work at four o'clock our time. 

SM: That is confusing. To deal with that must be a bit tricky. 

CT: It is. Especially when we're trying to set meetings, we have to be very clear to say if it is ten o'clock Alberta time or ten o'clock Saskatchewan time. And then if you're travelling, you have to plan your driving in accordance with that as well. 

Cindy Trigg's and Susan McReynolds' comments have been edited and condensed. This online segment was prepared by Ayesha Barmania.

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