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Are there enough volunteers to get the jobs done in your community?

A new year always brings out intentions to do better — eat less, exercise more. But good intentions aimed at the community seem to be in decline. From fire fighting, to meals on wheels, to youth groups and sports — it's getting harder to find helping hands. Is there enough goodwill to get the jobs done in your community? With guest host Natasha Fatah.
Volunteer Chelsea Lamar paints a home still damaged by Hurricane Katrina, part of the group Rebuilding Together's "Fifty for Five" effort. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Listen to the full episode1:53:44

A new year always brings out intentions to do better — eat less, exercise more. But good intentions aimed at the community seem to be in decline. From fire fighting, to meals on wheels, to youth groups and sports — it's getting harder to find helping hands. Is there enough goodwill to get the jobs done in your community? What's succeeding in your community — and what's not?

Over the holiday season, many Canadians gave some time and effort helping others - some served food to the homeless and others delivered presents and clothes to needy families.It seems the thing to do at this time of year.

But as the year ends and a new one begins, does that spirit of goodwill carry forward? Or does it dissipate, like so many New Year's resolutions?

According to some people in the field, it's harder now to get Canadians to commit to volunteer work and they are alarmed by the trend. Are we becoming more selfish? Others say it's not that simple - they say it's the nature of volunteering that's changing.

At this time of reflection and resolution, it's an opportunity to find out what you think about the current status of volunteer programs in your community.

Our question today: Are there enough volunteers to get things done in your community?

Guests

Paula Speevak, President and CEO of Volunteer Canada Ottawa, Ont.
Twitter: @VolunteerCanada  

Michael Van Pelt, President and CEO of the public policy think tank, Cardus
Twitter: @MichaelHVanPelt