Cross Country Checkupwith Ian Hanomansing

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As his presidency comes to a close, Trump feeling 'desperate', says estranged niece

Mary Trump, who is a psychologist, author and the niece of Donald Trump, shared her insight into the U.S. president, and answered callers' questions as part of Cross Country Checkup's regular Ask Me Anything series.

Enforcing pandemic rules can slow COVID-19 spread, but experts say limits are needed

As COVID-19 cases spike in some regions, public health officials say more needs to be done to ensure people are complying with health measures meant to slow the spread of the virus, but experts say the role of police should be examined.
Sunday on Checkup

How far should we go to enforce COVID-19 restrictions?

Whether it's the police, a bylaw officer, your boss or calling the neighbour yourself, how do you think rule breakers should be dealt with?
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Impeaching Donald Trump could help Republican Party 'cleanse itself', says David Frum

Conservative commentator David Frum has long been a critic of Donald Trump, and he believes that in the wake of a siege on the U.S. Capitol, the U.S. president's standing among Republicans is dropping.

Why some parents and experts say keeping schools closed hurts children

Some provinces have pushed back the return of in-person classes in a bid to slow the spread of COVID-19, but some parents and experts worry that closing classrooms could have significant long-term effects on children.
Sunday on Checkup

Is it safe to go back to school this winter?

Parents, teachers and premiers are divided: should schools open, close or remain online indefinitely?
Q&A

'No points gained for rationing out the vaccine,' says Dr. Jane Philpott

With COVID-19 vaccines at the forefront of the news, Dr. Jane Philpott, Canada's former federal health minister, says the country should adopt a one-million-per-week vaccine plan.

How concerned should Canadians be about the U.K. strain of COVID-19?

As vaccines continue to roll out across Canada, questions are being raised about a new coronavirus variant first reported in the U.K. that’s believed to spread faster than the original version of the virus. Professor Ravi Gupta gives us the details of the virus, and Dr. Zain Chagla explains if Canadians should be worried.
Sunday on Checkup

What concerns you about COVID-19, the variant and the vaccines?

As two new vaccines roll out in Ontario, a new COVID variant is sweeping the United Kingdom. This Sunday, we answer your concerns about the virus, the variant and the vaccines.

CBC journalists name their most memorable non-COVID news stories of the year

CBC journalists David Common, Salimah Shivji, Bob Murphy, Duncan McCue and Adrienne Arsenault pick their most memorable non-COVID-19 news stories of 2020.
Sunday on Checkup

What's the most important non-COVID news story of the year?

Join our CBC News correspondent panel as they discuss some of the most important non-COVID-19 stories of 2020...ones overshadowed by the pandemic.
Q&A

Jenn Grant reflects on the year 2020 and shares her love of the holidays

Last month, Halifax-based singer-songwriter Jenn Grant released her holiday album, Forever on Christmas Eve, and has been traveling throughout the city spreading Christmas cheer. She spoke with Checkup's Ian Hanomansing about what it is she loves about the season.
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Ask Me Anything: Santa Claus answers kids' questions on Cross Country Checkup

The man in red takes calls from kids in a special holiday edition of Checkup's Ask Me Anything series.
Sunday on Checkup

What's your song or message for the ones you're missing over the holidays?

Gathering with family and friends might be cancelled this Christmas — but not on Cross Country Checkup.
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Flaky pies & perfectly baked cookies: Pastry chef Anna Olson shares her tips

It’s the time of year where kitchens across the country are filled with the smells of cookies and pies. But if you’re new to baking — or looking for some expert tricks — celebrity pastry chef Anna Olson has some tips to share.
Sunday on Checkup

Will you be first or last in line for the COVID-19 vaccination?

The speculation is over. Health Canada has approved a COVID-19 vaccine for use in Canada. What COVID-19 risks are you facing?
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Ultra-cold storage and slowing transmission: Your COVID-19 vaccine questions answered

Amid reports that the federal government's top health agency could soon approve a COVID-19 vaccine, the start of a return to normalcy may feel within reach for many Canadians, a Toronto physician says. Still, many have questions about the shot's rollout and safety.
Sunday on Checkup

How are you doing Christmas differently?

As the holidays approach, the big Christmas rethink is on thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thinking outside the box could offer a 'refreshing change' this holiday season, says psychologist

For many Canadians, the winter holidays offer a time to connect with friends and loved ones — but because of COVID-19, it won't be business as usual this year. Clinical psychologist Rehman Abdulrehman says it's a good time to try new ways of celebrating.

This year, Santa Claus is just a video call away

2020 will be remembered as the year that gatherings went virtual — and for Santa, it’s no different. With malls closed and get-togethers postponed, Santa Claus performers are going virtual this Christmas.
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Ask Me Anything: Dr. Samir Sinha on long-term care

Long-term care homes across the country are once again facing a wave of COVID-19 outbreaks. Dr. Samir Sinha is the director of geriatrics at Sinai Health System and University Health Network Hospitals in Toronto and answers caller questions.
Sunday on Checkup

Are you gathering with friends and family this Christmas?

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief public health officer, says the holidays need to look a little different this year — a little more distanced with no large gatherings. What are you doing differently?

Using mRNA to develop vaccines wasn't 'on my radar,' says Moderna co-founder

In 2008, stem cell biologist Derrick Rossi discovered that modified messenger RNA, or mRNA as it's more commonly known, can prompt the body to quickly produce proteins that trigger an immune response. That work is now the basis of a promising coronavirus vaccine.
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Ask Me Anything: Peter Mansbridge

Peter Mansbridge, former CBC broadcaster and author of Extraordinary Canadians: Stories from the Heart of our Nation, answers listeners questions.

Experts worry that making a COVID-19 vaccine mandatory could harm public trust

As parts of Canada face a second lockdown amid rising COVID-19 cases, vaccines are being touted as a solution to the pandemic and the resulting economic hardship facing businesses. But experts say that when a shot becomes available, making it mandatory could do more harm than good.

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