Blogs·Special

For Family's Sake: exploring the joys and sorrows of having kin

Host Andrea Bellemare explores the messy relationships that come with having kin. We asked CBC reporters across the country to get in touch with stories about family that have stayed with them. We’ll hear why these stories resonated and how the families are doing now their stories have aired.

Reporters across the country share stories that stayed with them

Clockwise from top left: Twins Sachin and Mara Tartamella in Montreal; Ala Awkim, Ammar Al-Hendi and Mohamma Al-Hendi in Kitchener, Ont.; Eva Yassie in Manitoba; 6 generations of women in the same family in southern Alberta. (Shari Okeke, Andrea Bellemare, Donna Carreiro, Caroline Wagner/CBC)

Host Andrea Bellemare explores the messy relationships that come with having kin. We asked CBC reporters across the country to get in touch with stories about family that have stayed with them. 51:25

Reporters don't often talk publicly about how stories they've worked on have affected them – especially not personal ones.

So for this Family Day special, host Andrea Bellemare asked CBC reporters across Canada to follow up on stories about family that they can't stop thinking about and to find out how the families are doing now the stories have aired. 

She got replies from across the country: Stories of hope and humour, as well as stories about coping with loss and rebuilding broken family ties.

CBC Winnipeg producer Donna Carreiro said of her interviews with Eva Yassie, "I've been a journalist for more than three decades and many stories stay with every single journalist, every journalist has that right? Eva, I definitely think this is a story that will stick with me more than other story." You''ll hear more of her relationship with Eva Yassie and the forced relocation of the Sayisi Dene in northern Manitoba, alongside other stories from across the country.

This special was produced by CBC's Mieke Anderson.

Featured on the show: 

Tom Zink, age 12 (right) sits with his brother Steve, age 13. (Supplied/Tom Zink)
Sisters Shannon Clarke and Liz Gordon were separated when Clarke was given up for adoption, but 14 years later they discovered they'd been walking the halls of the same school for years. (submitted by Shannon Clarke)
  • Liz Gordon and Shannon Clarke both went to the same high school, but they didn't realize they were related until a mutual friend introduced them. The sisters share a biological mother, but Clarke was adopted at a young age. They share their thoughts on building their relationship with CBC's Rachel Zelniker. Plus, it turns out there's another family connection they're just learning about.
  • It's not every day six generations of women from the same family are all living at the same time. CBC Calgary's Caroline Wagner met the family – and found out the secret to living a long life. 

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