As It Happens

"We need to act": WWF's response to its report of 52% drop in world wildlife population

The number is alarming. The World Wildlife Fund's 2014 Living Planet Report reveals that the world's wildlife population has dropped by more than half since 1970. And WWF Canada president David Miller issues a fair warning to humans about the detrimental way in which humans currently live....
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The number is alarming. The World Wildlife Fund's 2014 Living Planet Report reveals that the world's wildlife population has dropped by more than half since 1970. And WWF Canada president David Miller issues a fair warning to humans about the detrimental way in which humans currently live.

The declining numbers are seen in populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles. The main causes for their decreased numbers include agricultural practices affecting freshwater sources, deforestation, and the impacts of climate change. Miller tells Carol the alarm bells are sounding.
We've seen in things like the cod fishery in Newfoundland 30 years ago what happens when we don't pay attention to these trends. And in the case of the cod fishery it wasn't just the ecosystem that collapsed, it was the entire human way of life that had depended on it for hundreds of years.

But Miller says that people can protect biodiversity and reverse the trends if they take action now.

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