As It Happens

Nigerian schoolgirls abduction: A timeline of As It Happens coverage

On April 14, more than 200 girls were kidnapped from a school in northern Nigeria by Nigeria's Islamist Boko Haram militants. Families of the girls are growing increasingly desperate, and the campaign to free the girls has gone global. Here is a collection of our coverage on this story over the past few weeks....

On April 14, more than 200 girls were kidnapped from a school in northern Nigeria by Nigeria's Islamist Boko Haram militants. Families of the girls are growing increasingly desperate, and the campaign to free the girls has gone global. Here is a collection of our coverage on this story over the past few weeks.

   
   
     
           
         
   
   
    May 12, 2014   
A video is released by Boko Haram militants, featuring leader Abubakar Shekau, who demands the release of jailed members of his group in return for the kidnapped female students. Mohammed Kabir Mohammed is a reporter with the BBC's Hausa Service in Nigeria. We reached him in Abuja. 
   
   
     
           
         
   
   
    May 9, 2014   
It's a hashtag that's been trending around the world, tweeted by everyone from the First Lady of the United States to Kim Kardashian. #BringBackOurGirls aims to raise awareness about the more than 200 girls who have been kidnapped in Nigeria. Photographer Ami Vitale was among the many supporters of the #BringBackOurGirls campaign. And then she realized it was misusing some of her images. The young woman shown in one of the campaign's most popular images wasn't abducted. She's not even Nigerian. We reached Ami Vitale in Missoula, Montana.   
   
   
     
           
         
   
   
    May 2, 2014   
Ibrahim Chuda is the father of one of the girls who was kidnapped. We've changed his name because he fears reprisals from the kidnappers. We spoke with Mr. Chuda through an interpreter. Sa'ida Sa'ad is a lawyer and opposition party member in Abuja. In the interest of saving time, we have removed her translation of Carol's questions. We reached Mr. Chuda in the northeastern town of Chibok.   
   
   
     
           
         
   
   
    April 23, 2014   
People in northeastern Nigeria are growing increasingly desperate, and angry. Militants stormed a boarding school and kidnapped more than 200 teenage girls. Most of those girls have not been seen since. Now, local residents are taking it upon themselves to search for their children. Heather Murdock is a reporter with the Christian Science Monitor. We reached her in Abuja, Nigeria.   
   

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now