As It Happens

Tuesday: Lac-Megantic charges, CBC President Hubert Lacroix, H. R. Giger obit, and more...

There's hope for the future in Lac-Mégantic -- but as charges are laid for last summer's train disaster, it's tough to move on from the past...He made the kind of art you could still see with your eyes closed. We'll remember H.R. Giger -- who created glistening, terrifying hybrid creatures we sometimes wish we could forget...and in Carol's feature interview...
  There's hope for the future in Lac-Mégantic -- but as charges are laid for last summer's train disaster, it's tough to move on from the past...He made the kind of art you could still see with your eyes closed. We'll remember H.R. Giger -- who created glistening, terrifying hybrid creatures we sometimes wish we could forget...and in Carol's feature interview with CBC President Hubert Lacroix, she'll ask him the questions you asked her to ask him about the future of the public broadcaster. 

Part One

Lac-Megantic charges
As criminal charges come down against the Montreal Main and Atlantic and three of its employees for the Lac Megantic train disaster, we hear from one woman who nearly lost her life at the Musi-Cafe, the community cornerstone that's now set to be rebuilt.

H. R. Giger obit
The late H.R. Giger didn't make the kind of art you hang above your couch -- unless you live in a haunted cave. But his visions of disturbing, glistening creepiness made him a legend.

Supreme Court of Canada artist fees
A group representing Canadian artists wants them to negotiate a minimum fee for showing their work at the National Gallery -- and it's taking that demand all the way to the Supreme Court.

   

Part Two

Google privacy
If a link about yourself you don't like comes up when you search Google, tough luck. Unless you live in Europe -- where the EU's top court has just ruled that Google must allow you to delete that link. That's good news for privacy advocates -- and bad news for search engines.

Pemberton landslide
Homeowners in a B.C. subdivision are warned to leave their houses because of potential landslides -- but our guest is nowhere near ready to pack up and go.

   

Part Three

Feature interview with CBC President and CEO Hubert LaCroix
More cuts. More lost jobs. And soon, no hockey. The CBC is at a crossroads -- and there are plenty of people willing to offer us directions. Later, I'll speak with CBC President Hubert Lacroix about which of those directions he thinks may be the way forward -- and which lead to a dead end. We asked you to send in your questions for the President. And Carol presented some of your concerns about the public broadcaster to Mr. Lacroix.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now