As It Happens

Thursday: Jim Prentice, Crimea: journalist, CRTC CanCon porn, and more...

Former Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice on his new job: resetting Enbridge's damaged relationship with First Nations, to win support for the Northern Gateway pipeline...Western leaders say Crimea's planned referendum on whether to join Russia violates international law; but more important, it could inflame an already volatile situation...and the CRTC tears a strip off Canadian porn channels for not featuring...
Former Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice on his new job: resetting Enbridge's damaged relationship with First Nations, to win support for the Northern Gateway pipeline...Western leaders say Crimea's planned referendum on whether to join Russia violates international law; but more important, it could inflame an already volatile situation...and the CRTC tears a strip off Canadian porn channels for not featuring enough Canadian content -- and tonight, we'll hear from a homegrown porn star about whether our industry is up to get down.

Part One

Jim Prentice
Enbridge enlists former Environment Minister Jim Prentice to work with western Canadian First Nations in an effort to gain their approval for the Northern Gateway pipleine project.

Crimea journalist
The vote has been set: just ten days from now, Crimea will vote on whether to join Russia. But the west has condemned the vote -- and tensions in the region remain so high that experts fear what may happen.

CRTC CanCon porn
Canada's telecommunications regulator has warned porn channels that while they're running enough adult content -- it's not enough Canadian content. We speak with homegrown porn star and director Brad Armstrong, who puts his finger on exactly what's wrong.

Part Two

Line 9 decision
The National Energy Board approves Enbridge's Line 9 project -- which will reverse the flow of oil through an existing pipeline, and crank up the current of crude.

Utoya memorial
The artist commissioned to create a memorial to the victims of the massacre in Norway describes his project -- which represents the country's loss with a literal gap.

Part Three

Minimum wage: worker/lawyer
For 10 years, Terri-Lynn Garrie worked for $1.25 an hour. Not in the 1950S -- in this century. Now, Ms. Garrie -- who has an intellectual disability -- has won a human-rights case that awards her $150,000 from her former employer.

Lev Tahor followup
A spokesperson for the Jewish Orthodox group Lev Tahor says members of his community left Canada because they are being persecuted for simply being Lev Tahor.

Pension overpay
A woman receives a letter of condolence from her late husband's former employer, the Long Island Railroad -- along with an invoice for the $27,000 it had overpaid on his pension benefits.

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