As It Happens

Long overdue: US veterans receive the Medal of Honor, after denied due to prejudice

They were initially passed over because of their race or religion. But this week in Washington, that injustice was corrected, and 24 American soliders were finally given the U.S. military's highest award - the Medal of Honor.Of the honorees, only 3 are still living, and all had served in World War II, the Korean War, or in Vietnam....
They were initially passed over because of their race or religion. But this week in Washington, that injustice was corrected, and 24 American soliders were finally given the U.S. military's highest award - the Medal of Honor.

Of the honorees, only 3 are still living, and all had served in World War II, the Korean War, or in Vietnam.

In 2002, the U.S. Congress called for a review of the veterans from those wars to ensure that none were denied the Medal of Honor because of racial or religious prejudice.

On Tuesday, President Barack Obama presented the awards. Among the posthumous recipients was Felix Conde-Falcon, an Hispanic-American who was killed in Vietnam. His son Richard accepted the medal on his father's behalf. 

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