Friday: L'Isle Verte follow-up, punctuation signs, Tom Mulcair, airport security haggis poet, and more...

Tonight: The cold light of the day after. Philippe Lépicier used to run a pharmacy out of the seniors' residence in L'Isle Verte -- and he'll tell us how he and the town are coping, in the aftermath of the fatal fire. Too much oil on our rails? They planted, they tended, they harvested -- and now, grain farmers across...
Listen to the full episode25:20

Tonight:

The cold light of the day after. Philippe Lépicier used to run a pharmacy out of the seniors' residence in L'Isle Verte -- and he'll tell us how he and the town are coping, in the aftermath of the fatal fire.

Too much oil on our rails? They planted, they tended, they harvested -- and now, grain farmers across the Prairies are facing a stubborn obstacle: a backlog on Canada's railway system.

Division multiplies. While anti-government demonstrations spread from Kiev across Ukraine, a member of the country's governing party tells us why he believes the whole thing will be solved by talking. 

We're just checking in to see what position the Opposition is in. With Parliament set to sit again next week, we'll reach NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, to find out what is next for the Senate Expenses scandal.

Getting a little possessive. In Cambridge, England, the city council banned apostrophes on street signs -- and now, roving grammar vigilantes are restoring the missing punctuation.

And...bomb appetit. It took a lot of guts for a Scottish poet to write a poem about having a traditional dish mistaken for explosives at the airport -- and most of those guts were in the haggis in question.

As It Happens, the Friday edition. Radio that figures, with or without the security hassle, he would have had an offal experience. 

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