As It Happens

Supreme Court rules government, corporations must have consent of First Nations to use land in BC

The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the Tsilhqot'in Nation has aboriginal title to nearly 2000 square kilometres of land in south central BC. The decision means that any governments or businesses wanting to use the land must have the consent of the aboriginal title holders....
The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the  Tsilhqot'in Nation has aboriginal title to nearly 2000 square kilometres of land in south central BC. The decision means that any governments or businesses wanting to use the land must have the consent of the aboriginal title holders.

Roger William is Chief of the Xeni Gwet'in First Nation, which is one of the bands that makes up the Tsilhqot'in Nation. He has been fighting for this decision for 25 years. He has drawn inspiration from his parents, Elders and his people, and recognizes that the groundwork has been laid over the past forty years by similar title cases that have ended in defeat.


The decision does leave room for development to go ahead without the consent of the Tsilhqot'in Nation, if the government or party involved can prove a 'compelling and substantial public interest'.



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