As It Happens

Conservative John Crosbie 'astonished' as party brass rejects son as candidate

Newfoundland Conservative legend John Crosbie says he is "shocked" by the party's rejection of his son Ches as a candidate in the upcoming federal election. Ches Crosbie is a prominent St. John's lawyer and had been the only person vying for the Conservative nomination in Avalon. On Wednesday, however, Ches issued a press release saying that "decision-makers at party headquarters in Ottawa decided I wasn't the type of candidate they wanted."
Ches Crosbie (right) sits beside his father, former federal cabinet minister John Crosbie, as Ches Crosbie announced Thurs., Dec. 18, 2014 in Conception Bay South, N.L., he'll seek the Conservative nomination in the federal Avalon riding. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sue Bailey (The Canadian Press)

Newfoundland Conservative legend John Crosbie says he is "shocked" by the party's rejection of his son Ches as a candidate in the upcoming federal election.

Ches Crosbie is a prominent St. John's lawyer and was the only person vying for the Conservative nomination in Avalon. On Wednesday, Ches issued a press release saying that "decision-makers at party headquarters in Ottawa decided I wasn't the type of candidate they wanted."

Ches Crosbie was not available for comment but his father, John Crosbie, the former federal cabinet minister and Lieutenant Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador, could barely contain his frustration. "The audacity of some small, unknown committee of people up in Ottawa that could have this power...is not only insulting, it's a disgrace...I can't explain my scorn and disdain. I am am really browned off!"

He says the only issue the party brass had raised with his son was a joke he told at a law society fundraiser. The joke was about the government and former Conservative Senator Mike Duffy.

"If it wasn't for my age, I'm 84, I'd bloody-well put my hat in the ring in the next couple of weeks. I'd run myself...I'm tempted to do that."

Crosbie Sr. believes that unelected Newfoundland Conservatives in Ottawa may have seen his son's possible candidacy as a threat. "They don't care about helping the party. They want to help themselves be influential in all Newfoundland affairs so they can dictate to us down here in Newfoundland what the federal attitude is."

Crosbie believes the Prime Minister should be held accountable. "I can't understand why the leader of the party would let these flunkies from his office or somebody's staff dealing with Newfoundland affairs...why they would be allowed to cause the trouble that they're causing."

"To be insulted like this, it's just intolerable."

Crosbie looks ahead to the upcoming election, "I'm very disappointed in the party and how they're behaving. They're going to have a hell of a hard job to win the next election, that's for sure."

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