As It Happens

Church bells ring 1,181 times for Canada's missing and murdered aboriginal women

As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission comes to an end, the Anglican Church has asked parishes across the country to toll their bells in remembrance -- culminating in one for each of the 1,181 indigenous women who have died or disappeared.
A Whitehorse church rang its bells to honour missing and murdered aboriginal women. Bishop of Yukon Larry Robertson led a prayer at the Christ Church Cathedral in Whitehorse. (CBC)
Listen1:59

As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission comes to an end, the Anglican Church has asked parishes across the country to toll their bells in remembrance -- culminating in one for each of the 1,181 indigenous women who have died or disappeared.

The Church asked parishes across the nation to toll the bells in a gesture of solidarity with Aboriginal Peoples following the landmark report by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Today, we aired the solemn remembrance from churches in St. John's, Charlottetown, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Whitehorse and Vancouver. The voices you'll hear are Yukon bishop Larry Robertson and Matthew Quick, who rang the bells at St. James in Vancouver.

Christ Church Cathedral in Montreal was one of 50 churches that rang its bells today to commemorate the missing and murdered Aboriginal women on the RCMP list. (Radio-Canada)
Dean of Saskatoon's St. John's Anglican Cathedral Scott Pittendrigh hopes the ringing of the church bells will draw attention to an important issue. (Rachel Bergen/CBC News)
Venerable John Clarke, archdeacon of P.E.I. and rector of St. Paul's church rings the bells. (Brian Higgins/CBC)
Cathedral bells will ring each Wednesday until National Aboriginal Day on June 21 0:33

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