As It Happens

Mosquito-killing champ terminates 135 bugs in 15 minutes with his bare hands

A Swedish man has just been crowned the world champion. Kristoffer Ekesund says the key to his win was letting the mosquitoes bite him before going in for the kill.
Kristoffer Ekersund says suffering through over 200 mosquito bites on his legs is worth it because he is now the world champion. (Facebook)
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Mosquitoes in Sweden have a new nemesis: Kristoffer Ekersund. He's just been named the world champion of mosquito killers.

You can't smash them because you have to be able to count them afterwards, so you have to be a little sensitive with your fingers.- Kristoffer Ekersund, mosquito-killing world champ

"It was the first competition last year and I ended up in second place and I hate to lose, so it was good to win," Ekersund tells As It Happens guest host Helen Mann.

Ekersund and 50 other people walked into a field and were given 15 minutes to catch and kill as many mosquitoes as they could.

A female aedes japonicus mosquito is seen biting a person in this 2015 photo. (HO-Sean McCann/CP)

"You can't smash them because you have to be able to count them afterwards, so you have to be a little sensitive with your fingers."

Ekersund won the world championship of mosquito killing with 135 kills in 15 minutes. He says the secret to his success was letting the mosquitoes bite him first. He estimates he has more than 200 mosquito bites on his legs as a result.

"It just itches a bit. It's totally worth it. I am a world champion now," says Ekersund.

For more on the competition and Kristoffer Ekersund's technique, listen to our full interview.

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