As It Happens

Take a listen to remixes inspired by David Cameron's jaunty 'doo doo' resignation ditty

We may never know why David Cameron decided to do some scat-singing after announcing his immediate departure — but we already know what it sounds like with a hot beat underneath.
British Prime Minister David Cameron returns to Number 10 Downing Street after making a statement on July 11, 2016 in London, England. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

We don't know what it's like to step down as British Prime Minister. But if you hum a few bars...

This week, we played a candid clip of UK Prime Minister David Cameron, after he told reporters he would resign by Wednesday. Then, with his lapel mic still hot, the outgoing PM treated those gathered around Ten Downing Street to an impromptu little ditty. 

David Cameron hums a tune

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5 years ago
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British PM heard singing after officially announcing his resignation at a news conference Monday 0:21
Theories quickly made the rounds on social media: Was this the last haunting whimper of a broken man? The joyful doo-doo-ing of a man relieved to wash his hands of a colossal mess and return to his afternoon tea? Or was it simply the security code for the door?

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks to the press outside 10 Downing Street in London, Wednesday July 13, 2016, as his family look on. Cameron steps down Wednesday after six years as prime minister. (Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP)


Regardless, "where words fail, music speaks" and Cameron's four jaunty notes immediately inspired a series of remixes — making "post-Brexit-former-PM-wave" a strong contender for the sound of summer 2016. We've gone ahead and compiled a "Best Of" for your listening pleasure.

Here is a mash-up by Graeme Coleman of Scotland to get us started. 



Some have called the humming a song of relief. But YouTube user Ronald The Great unlocked the latent joy in the four-note phrase with this happy jingle. 

The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation got in on the fun with this infectious groove.

Finally, composer Thomas Hewitt Jones highlighted the unresolved pain in the PM's doo-doo ditty. Here is a sample of his piece, Cameron's Lament.

Now over to you, As It Happens' listeners. What do you make of the doo-doo to-do? You can let us know on Twitter — our handle is @cbcasithappens. You can comment on our Facebook page or call us at 416-205-5687. And you can email us your very own remix at aih@cbc.ca. 

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