CBC.ca | Quebec AM

January 2012 Archives

Shafia case raises questions about access to youth protection services

In the wake of the Shafia trial verdict, questions are being raised about whether youth protection could have intervened in the violent home situation. Madeleine Bedard is the director of Youth Protection for Batshaw Youth and Family Centres.

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Measures trappers are taking to avoid trapping unintended species

Following up on last week's stories of people's pets getting caught in traps intended for coyotes. Trappers are trying to catch one specific kind of animal, but sometimes accidents happen. Pierre Canac-Marquis is a trapper, and the coordinator of the Canadian Trap Research Program. He explains how trappers try to avoid these mistakes.

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Earlier on Quebec AM:

Inuit lore behind the Northern lights

Northernlightsbaby.jpg

The aurora borealis is a stunning natural phenomenon. But in Inuit lore, the northern lights are also a sinister force that scares children into going to bed on time.

Gilles Boutin is a Northern Lights hunter based in Levis, Quebec. He spoke to CBC's Ainslie MacLellan.

We also hear from Annie Baron, who explains why she was scared of the Northern Lights as a child.

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Concerns about electro-pollution from new Hydro-Quebec smart meters

Hydro-Quebec is facing opposition to its plan to install smart meters in every home, because of concerns about electro-pollution. Glenn Wanamaker brings us that story from Hydro-Quebec, the project's critics, and Health Canada.
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Future of windmill industry in Quebec

windmill.JPGThe province of Quebec doesn't have windmill projects scheduled for after 2015. Quebec's Travelling Journalist Marika Wheeler will tell us why that is cause for concern in the Gaspé.

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Shafia trial verdict

The three defendants in the Shafia trial in Kingston, Ontario have been found guilty of first degree murder, for what the Crown argued were honour killings. Saleha Khan works with the Muslim Resource Centre in London, Ontario and tells us what impact this verdict could have in preventing similar deaths.

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For more coverage of this story, visit our CBC News website: Shafia jury finds all guilty of 1st degree murder

Political Panel: Parti Quebecois drama-free Conseil National

The Parti Quebecois looked like one big happy family at their meeting on the weekend. But a resolution on referendums has some saying Pauline Marois has kept her leadership, but given in to the pur et dur sovereignists on party platform. Rheal Seguin was there, and brings us his view of the weekend's events.

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Acclaimed scientist Dr. Jacques Pepin talks about his book "The Origin of AIDS"

For many years, the origins of the virus that causes AIDS were a mystery and the history had been little explored. Dr. Jacques Pepin, microbiologist, epidemiologist and professor at the Universite de Sherbrooke, set out to fill in the blanks.

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How to make the best of your snowshoeing adventure

Our camping guru Kevin Callan shares his own snowshoeing secrets and lets you in on everything you need to know about the increasingly popular winter sport.

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Enquete investigation into death of a woman receiving a spa treatment

Some of you may recall headlines last summer about a Quebec woman who died after receiving spa treatments in a facility in Drummondville. The Radio-Canada program Enquete has been looking into that case and producer Allan Johnson brings us a preview of the report airing tonight.

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New 30-million dollar sports complex in Lac Megantic

centresportifmegantic.JPGThe town of Lac Megantic has a brand new sports complex. Those who use it are thrilled about it, but people in some neighbouring villages say it's too big and too expensive. Our Townships reporter Alison Brunette brings us that story. 
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Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation reaction to "Pink Ribbons, Inc."

Following up on our conversation about a new documentary called "Pink Ribbons, Inc." The documentary takes a tough look at the pink ribbon campaigns for breast cancer research, but not every agrees with all of its criticisms. The Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation's chair of the board Nathalie Le Prohon joins us to discuss some of the contentious issues.

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Pink Ribbons, Inc. takes a look at the industry around breast cancer

PinkRibbonsIncPoster.pngA new documentary, Pink Ribbons, Inc. is casting a less than rosey light on the billion-dollar industry that's grown up around the pink-ing of breast cancer in the name of raising funds for research.

Lea Pool is the director of the new NFB documentary. She joined host Susan Campbell to talk about some of the questions she raises. The movie opens in 30 theatres across Canada on February 3rd.

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Some protected species of birds accidentally injured and killed by hunting traps

First foxes, then dogs... now, birds. We'll hear more information about some endangered birds of prey who are suffering major injuries or killed by wire traps intended for coyotes. Wade Gapes is the coordinator for the Centre d'interprétation des battures et de réhabilitation des oiseaux in St. Fulgence.

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Coyote snares and traps pose hazards for pets

Following up our Townships reporter Alison Brunette's story of a trapper in Lac Megantic who is trying to get coyotes. Lots of listeners shared their stories about other animals, including pets, are getting caught in the snares. Closer to Quebec City, in Sainte-Catherine-de-la-Jacques-Cartier, dog-owner Sara Seward tells us about her close call with her golden lab.

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City of Trois-Rivieres buys 300 year old rock

Cornerstone.jpgIt's been more than a century since a major fire destroyed a large part of Trois-Rivières. Many homes and businesses were lost, along with an early 18th century church. Now, a single stone from that church has been recovered - and the municipality wants to restore it to a place of honour.

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  • Église paroissiale Immaculée-Conception de Trois-Rivières City of Trois-Rivieres website

Special ombudsman report looks at treatment of elderly people

Seventy-five elderly people rushed into a makeshift nursing home without proper support never should have been treated that way. According to a special intervention report by the Quebec Ombudsman, it's possible some may have died as a result.  

Claude Dussault is the Deputy Ombudsman. He spoke with Quebec AM's Glenn Wanamaker.

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Newly elected Makivik president Jobie Tukkiapik

Voters in Nunavik have elected a new president of the Makivik corporation, the body which directs economic development in Quebec's north. Newly elected Jobie Tukkiapik joins Susan to talk about the tight race for the leadership role.
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Political Panel: ADQ and CAQ official merge

Seventy per cent of voting ADQ members approved the merger of their party with the new Coalition Avenir Québec. Rheal Seguin joins us to talk about what was said, as one chapter ended and another begins.
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Along the traplines in Lac Megantic

Lac-Mégantic-Greyfox.jpgA grey fox - a rare species for Quebec, pictured (right) - was trapped in Lac Megantic in December. The trap was meant for a coyote. CBC's Alison Brunette went out on those traplines, and brings us a look into whether trapping should be allowed if hunters can't control which animals are killed.

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NDP's interim leader Nycole Turmel in Quebec

Nycole Turmel was thrust into the leadership of the NDP after the death of Jack Layton. Now the party's interim leader is trying to guide her party through its first wave of real turbulence. She joined Susan in studio.

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Photographer behind cancelled nude female rugby calendar speaks out

The calendar controversy that refuses to go away. Originally conceived as a fundraiser by Laval University's female rugby team, it was first nixed by the school in late November. Now, they have also put the kibosh on attempts to publish it privately, without any school or sports team affiliation. Photographer Jacques Boissinot was behind the as of yet unpublished photographs, and joins Susan in studio.

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Update on shale gas in Quebec

In Quebec, shale gas exploration has basically been on hold since last spring. But that doesn't mean all is quiet. Quebec AM's Glenn Wanamaker joins Susan in studio to explain the latest developments.
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One of Nunavik's top jobs up for grabs

makivik.gifVoters are casting their ballots today to choose the president of the Makivik Corporation - the body created to represent Inuit under the James Bay Northern Quebec agreement. CBC North's William Tagoona talks to Susan about who is in the running, and how that person could have a big impact on the region's future.

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Looking at solutions for stressed farmers in Quebec

Farmers deal with weather, money woes, physical labour, bad crops and rarely get a break. The stress can build up, and they are often a high-risk group for suicide. We'll hear about plans for a new respite home for farmers, as well as some of the reasons why they are high-risk group for stress and suicide.

France Picard is a community outreach worker with Au Coeur des Familles Agricoles, the organization fundraising to build the new respite home.

Philippe Roy is a PhD student at Laval University. He is examining stress coping mechanisms among male farmers in Quebec.

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Early morning snow clearing adventures

IMG_1764.JPGQuebec AM's Julia Caron headed out with a private snow removal company in the early morning hours of a big winter storm. Here's what it sounded like behind the wheel of a truck from Group V.F.P., one of the many private snow removal companies in the city.

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Fighting for gender parity in the private sector

Premier Jean Charest has made it a goal to maintain a balance of men and women in his Cabinet. Now he wants the private sector to shape up as well. We'll hear our reporter Glenn Wanamaker in conversation with Charest's former Finance Minister Monique Jérôme-Forget about why she thinks the future depends on getting more women into high places.

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Roi du Coq Roti reopens its doors after 3-year labour dispute

Chicken and Poutine is back on the menu at one of Sherbrooke's most popular take-out counters. We'll hear more about the labour dispute which shut the restaurant down for more than three years - and we'll hear from some the clients who came running to yesterday's re-opening. The CBC's Alison Brunette brings us that story.

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Earlier on Quebec AM

 

Lise St-Denis explains why she left the NDP for the Liberal Party

Federal MP Lise St-Denis has been under fire ever since she announced last week she's turning her back on the NDP to join the Liberals. She joined Susan to explain why she made the decision, and what she thinks of those who say she should resign.
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Street Hockey on Rue du Mont Blanc

Sunday proved to have the ingredients for the perfect road hockey game - a ball, some sticks, a nice clean, snow-covered street, and no cars! Add an invitation to the players from the Québec Remparts, and you've got yourself a great road hockey game. That's what people on rue du Mont-Blanc in Beauport did yesterday. Glenn Wanamaker brings us the full game report.

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Assisting people with disabilities in Haiti

Building homes, and building limbs. Coming up, we'll from Handicap International about how they are helping Haitians disabled due to injuries sustained during the earthquake two years ago.

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New 3.8 million dollar teaching centre to train wind turbine technicians

This story originally aired on Breakaway. The Québec centre for wind turbine maintenance training officially opened its doors today at the Gaspé Campus of the Cégep de la Gaspésie et des Îles. Quebec's Traveling Journalist Marika Wheeler found out how this centre will help train the workers needed to fill the nearly 400 jobs in the industry by 2015.
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Learning how to snowboard on Mount Orford

A group of young people from Nunavik have been carving up Mount Orford for the past week - they're learning how to be snowboard instructors. Our Townships reporter Alison Brunette joined us from our Sherbrooke studio to tell us more about their visit, and what they plan to do with their new skills.

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Adventure Tourism in the Gaspé

The Gaspé is something of a paradise for people who like the outdoors. With mountains, rivers, lakes and the ocean, it's a big playground for outdoors enthusiasts. That's why the Cegep de la Gaspésie et les Iles de la Madelaine offers a one-of-a-kind program in Adventure Tourisim.

Some people point to the adventure tourism industry as one of the areas that have created jobs and growth in the Gaspé.

The CBC's Marika Wheeler spoke to Sonali Karnick about the program and its importance to the region.

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Quebec shovels help Alaskan town with "Snowpocalypse"

A Quebec manufacturer of snow shovels is coming to the rescue of Cordova, Alaska. The small town is literally buried under 450 centimetres of snow, and it needs some real Bonhomme-sized snow shovels to dig out.

Garant snow shovel, in St-François-de-la-Rivière-du-Sud near Lévis has been making shovels since 1865.

Quebec AM's Glenn Wanamaker speaks with Cordova's information officer Allen Marquette and with the president of Garant, Jean Gaudreault.

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Kanpe helping Haiti village get back on its feet

Two years after the earthquake that devastated Haiti, we've heard reports of the slow rebuilding - how rubble is still being cleared in the streets of Port-au-Prince.

The Montreal organization Kanpe has been working outside the city, in the isolated village of Baille Tourible.

Susan speaks with Tania Orméjuste about Kanpe's efforts.

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Status of some same-sex marriages up in the air

A case in Ontario court has thrown the validity of thousands of same-sex marriages into question.

Lawyers for the federal government say gay and lesbian couples who travelled to Canada to tie the knot are not actually married, unless their own country recognizes it.

Thousands of foreign gay couples have come to Canada to get married since it became legal.

Susan speaks with Marc-Antoine Saumier, president of the Quebec Gay Chamber of Commerce.

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UPDATE on this story:

Canada's justice minister Rob Nicholson says the government will change its civil marriage law to recognize same-sex unions for people who live outside the country. Nicholson blames the previous Liberal government for creating a gap in the law. Read more at cbc.ca/news

CBC Doc Series: 8th Fire

The Anishinaabe nation has a prophecy, that Aboriginal Peoples and non-aboriginals would go through the era of seven fires, before finally coming to the 8th fire, a time of peace and cooperation between different peoples.

The new CBC documentary series 8th Fire goes beyond stereotypes to take a closer look at aboriginal life in Canada. It also examines the relationship between First Nations and non-native people in this country.

Susan speaks with CBC host Wab Kinew about the series.

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You can see the first part of the series, as well as profiles of Aboriginal Canadians in the series, at http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/8thfire/.

Haiti still rebuilding, two years after quake

It was two years ago today that a devastating earthquake hit Haiti, killing more than two hundred thousand people and destroying much of the country's infrastructure.

Quebec AM's Julia Caron speaks with Reginald Sorel, volunteer with several international development organizations, about what earthquake victims still need, two years later.

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Former Governor General of Canada Michaëlle Jean is currently a UNESCO envoy to Haiti. She talks about some of the obstacles facing the Haitian government when it comes to rebuilding.

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White Birch employees reject company's offer

With the future of their workplace on the line, employees of the White Birch paper mill in Quebec City voted last night to REJECT the latest -- and apparently the final -- contract offer from the company.

Workers voted massively against that offer - a 91% no vote.

The rejection leaves the future of the mill up in the air. Already under bankruptcy protection, it was closed December 9th for an indefinite period.

White Birch had been hoping to deliver a new collective agreement to a potential buyer, the Black Diamond investment fund.

Susan speaks with Michel Ouimet, executive vice president of the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers' union, which represents the 600 workers at the White Birch mill.

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Léon Mugesera's status still uncertain

Canada's border services agency says a Rwandan man wanted for inciting genocide will be forced to leave the country today. 

Yesterday, a federal court rejected Léon Mugesera's request to stay the deportation order against him. The United Nations committee on torture has asked Canada not to carry out the order, until it can investigate whether he would be safe to return to Rwanda to stand trial.

As of this morning, Léon Mugesera is still in a Quebec City hospital, after suffering an unknown medical issue yesterday.

Susan speaks with Fannie Lafontaine, professor at Laval University, and expert in international criminal and humanitarian law.

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Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan also joins Susan with two different portraits of Léon Mugesera, from members of Quebec City's Rwandan community.

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Young families choosing Douglastown

Many young families are choosing Douglastown, in the Gaspé, as the community to call home. The CBC's Marika Wheeler visited that community to find out what's attracting people to that part of the peninsula.
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No checking at Pee Wee tourney

For the first time last year, the International Pee Wee Hockey tournament in Quebec City introduced a full-contact elite division. But this year Hockey Quebec has decided not to sanction checking, over fears of injuries.

Susan speaks with tournament organizer Patrick Dom.

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Dog shooting in the Eastern Townships

A family in the Sawyerville, in the Eastern Townships came home on New Year's Day to find their dog had been shot, after wandering onto a neighbour's property.

Provincial police are investigating. But the family is wants the municipality to intervene and enforce gun bylaws in the town limits. Quebec AM's Alison Brunette joins Susan with the details.

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Gérard Deltell on the ADQ merger vote

Members of the Action Démocratique party are voting on whether to fold their party into the Coalition Avenir Québec.

Susan speaks with the ADQ's current - and possibly last - leader, Gérard Deltell about the merger vote, and why he thinks his party is better off becoming part of the CAQ.

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Young families choosing Douglastown

Many young families are choosing Douglastown, in the Gaspé, as the community to call home. The CBC's Marika Wheeler visited that community to find out what's attracting people to that part of the peninsula.
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Léon Mugesera fights deportation order

Léon Mugesera is waiting to hear if he will be deported to Rwanda this week, to stand trial for inciting genocide. The former Rwandan government representative has been living in Quebec City for nearly two decades. Rwandan-Canadians have been watching the case closely.

Pierre Claver Nkinamubanzi is the vice-president of the Rwandan Canadian Congress and is opposed to Mugesera being deported.

Susan is also joined by Égide Karuranga, president of the Rwandan Diaspora of Canada, and Alice Musabende, a former CBC reporter in Quebec City, and currently a freelance journalist in Ottawa.

PART ONE:

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PART TWO:

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Young adults return to Gaspe

Returning retirees to the Gaspe are being joined by another demographic. Marika Wheeler says young adults wanting to raise their families are also returning to their roots.
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Redemption Inc. gives ex-cons a second chance

Ten former criminals will get the chance to walk the straight and narrow path, with help from multi-millionaire Kevin O'Leary. CBC TV's new reality show Redemption Inc. gives ex-cons the opportunity to compete for $100 000 to start their own legitimate business.

Susan speaks with former drug dealer, turned businessman and author, Brian O'Dea about his role on the show.

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ADQ members vote on merger

The political merger of the Action Démocratique and Coalition Avenir Québec will be decided over the next 10 days in a vote by ADQ members. Last month, the ADQ announced its intention to fold the party into the CAQ, but a majority of members have to approve the merger to make it official.

Susan speaks with Denis Claveau, president of the ADQ youth commission, who is dead set against the union.

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Unemployment rate reaches nearly quarter decade low in the Gaspé

For many years, the Gaspé had one of the highest unemployment rates in the province. But the job market there is shifting and the unemployment is the lowest it has been since the late 1980's. CBC's Marika Wheeler joins host Ainslie MacLellan to talk about the employment portrait.

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Léon Mugesera long legal battle may soon end

Léon Mugesera has lived in Quebec City for just about two decades. For much of that time, he's been a wanted man back in Rwanda. He stands accused of being among those who incited genocide in his birthplace. Close to one million people were slaughtered in a three-month frenzy of violence in 1994.

The core of the case against him lies in a speech he made, later re-broadcast on Rwandan radio, that's interpreted as a call for vengeance and killing of ethnic Tutsis. That evidence was brought before the Supreme Court of Canada, which ruled in 2005 that he should be expelled. He's been in legal limbo ever since.

Fannie Lafontaine teaches law at Université Laval and is a specialist in international human rights law. She's also worked in the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. She explains some of the recent developments.  

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Project Healing Waters in Quebec

Fishing enthusiasts have long known how relaxing the sport can be. However, it's only recently that fly fishing is been considered as potentially therapeutic. Project Healing Waters aims to help soldiers returning from combat missions deal with the adverse effects of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) through fly-fishing.

Gervais Jeffrey is the Quebec Director of Project Healing Waters. He tells Ainslie MacLellan how it helps reel in some of the lingering effects of combat missions.

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Tour de Ski

The Tour de Ski is an event that truly lives up to the name "cross-country" skiing. The 11-day event spans five different venues in Germany and Italy. Competitors have to master skate skiing and classic style, and both sprints and uphill slogs, sometimes all in the same race.

Three Canadian skiers are in the running: Devon Kershaw, Ivan Babikov, and Alex Harvey of Saint-Ferréol-les-Neiges, Quebec.

Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan speaks with coach Justin Wadsworth about the team's ups and downs on the course.

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