CBC.ca | Quebec AM

November 2011 Archives

Food for the soul

As Cree communities have moved away from a traditional foods, based on hunting and local plants, studies have shown that rates of diabetes have risen. Some in the Cree community also say that the change in diet and lifestyle has had an effect on the spiritual health of the people.

In our last installment of our series on northern food, Quebec AM's Julia Caron brings us her conversation with Eric House, General manager of the Chisasibi Business Centre, about the community's relationship with the land.

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New breast cancer screening guidelines

Canadian women are getting a different message than U.S. women when it comes to breast cancer screening. New Canadian guidelines recommend fewer mammograms for average risk women.

Susan speaks with Dr. Cornelia Baines of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health in Toronto about the debate over the new guidelines.

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Dr. Lin on swine flu

Just two short years after the H1N1 scare of 2009, swine flu appears to be making a comeback. The World Health Organization says a new flu virus is jumping from pigs to people in parts of the United States.

Our medical contributor Dr. Peter Lin tell us more about the new strain, H3N2 and whether we need to be worried.

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Wild about wild mushrooms

313182_10150495536183140_273848328139_10669894_4973358_n.jpgLast week, the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food invited researchers and members of the media to lunch - and the banquet consisted entirely of delicacies from the North. It was a way of showcasing a lesser-known element of the Plan Nord - the development of so-called biofoods. Among the most promising - wild mushrooms.

Exports of the Matsutake mushrooms account for a $500 million dollar industry. The vast majority are exported to Japan. Pierre Chevrier tells us how the Plan Nord might change that in the long run.

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Ottawa Report: Canada and the Kyoto Protocol

The latest round of international climate talks is underway in South Africa, and Canada is already being criticized in the wake of a report suggesting it's pulling out of the Kyoto Protocol. CBC Parliamentary Bureau reporter Louise Elliott explains.

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Cancer support group for Anglophones

People dealing with cancer may already feel isolated because of the disease. But what if a language barrier intensifies that isolation? Our Eastern Townships reporter Alison Brunette tells us about a support group for anglophone cancer patients in Stanstead that aims to bring English speaking patients and families together.

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Dissent in the Parti Quebecois ranks: Political Panel

Quebec AM's Political Panel joins us for a look at Pauline Marois' appearance last night on Tout le Monde en Parle after a week of door-slamming and punishments in the PQ. Rheal Seguin is the Globe and Mail's bureau chief in Quebec City and Gilbert Lavoie is political columnist for Le Soleil.

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Greenhouse gardens in Northern Quebec

basil_and_lettuce_web.jpgRocky terrain, lack of soil, long winters - agricultural researchers sure have their work cut out for them when it comes to developing sustainable food sources in Northern Quebec. Some are thinking outside the box in an attempt to find solutions to reduce the high cost and poor quality of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Ellen Avard, a Phd candidate at Université Laval in the department of forestry, geography and geomatics, is one of those people. She is spearheading efforts to bring greenhouse gardens to Northern Quebec. CBC's Julia Caron met with Avard, who tells us about the already existing community greenhouse garden in Kuujjuuaq, and the many benefits and challenges of this plan.

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Push for new playground at New Carlisle School

The New Carlisle School is in the running for financial help to buy some badly needed playground equipment, but it needs some community help. Sandy Astles-Belanger, a teacher at the school, explains how the Aviva Community contest works.

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Film producer Jake Eberts in Eastern Townships

Montreal-born, Arvida-raised film producer Jake Eberts is in his old stomping grounds this weekend. Our Eastern Townships reporter Alison Brunette caught up with him while he was in Sherbrooke to discuss everything from his latest project Jerusalem, to his connection to the region.

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Availability of psychiatric services for soldiers in distress

CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon has been following the story of a coroner's assessment of the availability of psychiatric services for soldiers in distress. This morning, she goes to the top for some answers. Her exclusive interview with the Surgeon General of the Armed Forces, Dr. Hans Jung in the next half-hour.

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Money down the drain? Sewer maintenance cartel unveiled

There's something smelly in the city of Sherbrooke, among others - a sewer maintenance cartel has been uncovered. Everyone's not equal when it comes to egouts. Donald Plouff, Assistant Deputy Commissioner of Canada's Competition Bureau, explains.

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Coastal communities adapting to climate change

The impacts of last December's flooding along the St. Lawrence River in Eastern Quebec are still being felt by its residents. The world of municipal zoning has had to evolve since the waves battered the shore. Quebec AM's Susan Woodfine has been looking at how new regulations are helping coastal communities adapt to climate change.

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Mental health services in the armed forces

The head of the Mental Health Centre at CFB Valcartier says everything possible was done to help a soldier in crisis. A coroner who reviewed the suicide of 35-year-old Stéphane Legendre recommended the center evaluate its delays to see a psychologist or psychiatrist.

In an exclusive interview, CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon spoke to Major Audrey Hudon, Mental Health Project Coordinator at CFB Valcartier.

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Investigation into racial profiling in Quebec City's police force

An investigative report tonight on Radio-Canada's program "Enquête" could ruffle some feathers in Quebec City. The program takes a look at the city's police force and its contention that there is a youth gang problem, and that it primarily revolves around young black, Latino, and other visible minorities. But the result is what critics say is racial profiling.

Aly Ndiaye -- better known as Webster -- is an historian by training. He's also a rap musician, brought up in Quebec City, and has become an outspoken social critic. He joined Susan in studio to talk about his involvement in the report, and his own experience with the problem.

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Suspicious fire in Saint Augustine

The troubled town of Saint Augustine on the Lower North Shore was the scene of a suspicious fire over the weekend. The incident prompted the town's mayor, Randy Maurice, to reiterate calls for provincial police to remain in the community for the time being. It also reinforces the need for the village to get proper firefighting equipment.

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Fermont community reaction to Plan Nord

Fermont 023.jpg The Liberal Government's 25-year plan to develop Quebec's North has come under political fire in the past week. But what do the people in the Northern parts of the province think about the expansive and long-term project?

Our travelling journalist Marika Wheeler is in Fermont, an historic mining community near the Labrador border, and brings us some of the voices from the people there. 

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Egyptian Quebecers rally in support of Cairo protests

Thousands of demonstrators on the streets of Cairo continue to call for an end to military rule in Egypt.

Susan speaks with Egyptian-Quebecer Ehab Latoyeff about rallies taking place in Montreal in support of the Egyptian people.

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Bishop's University Singers: Phoenix Rising

One of the many things the Phoenix Organisation in Halifax does is lend a helping hand to young people who are living on the street. Earlier this year, the organization also put together a youth choir, with the help of the director of the Bishop's University Singers. This week they are all in Sherbrooke - to perform one mass Gospel concert. Alison Brunette brings us that story.

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Quebec city father and son invent new "creeper"

Érik Sieb with Jay Leno and the BodyGuard at Leno's secret garage (credit: Creepex.com)The mechanic's creeper is an indispensible tool: a backboard on wheels that allows you to slide under a car to do work while it's on jacks. But its flat design leaves a mechanic vulnerable if the car accidentally falls.

That's why Érik Sieb and his son Kristopher invented the BodyGuard, which includes metal bars to protect the head and torso. The invention has even caught the attention of celebrity car-enthusiast Jay Leno, who invited the duo for a personal demo.

Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan caught up with Érik and Kristopher Sieb at Machinerie P&W in Quebec City, where their product is made.

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Pessamit Innu opposed to Plan Nord

One Innu community, the Pessamit, are refusing to accept the Quebec government's offer of compensation for development on their lands and their chief Raphael Picard has threatened to launch an international campaign against the Plan Nord. Ghislain Picard, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec explains.

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Minister of Aboriginal Affairs Geoff Kelley joined Susan Campbell in studio to discuss how the ministry reacted to the news.

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White Birch employees demand right to strike

111117_wh379_usine_papiers_white_birch_qc_sn635.jpgThe White Birch Paper Mill in Quebec City announced last week it would be closing its doors temporarily on December 9th. No date has been set to restart operations.

The mill's 600 workers are looking at an uncertain future.They lost their right to strike when the company applied for court protection from its creditors. Now they've asked the courts to restore that right, arguing the shutdown is a disguised lockout.

Susan speaks with Michel Ouimet, vice-president of the Quebec branch of the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada.

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Bishop's University Field Lacrosse Team receive a hero's welcome

Earlier this month the Bishop's University Field Lacrosse team the Gaiters brought home the Baggataway Cup, making them this year's national champions. Our townships correspondent Alison Brunette caught up with some of the players to find out more about their season, their victory and their future aspirations.
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Nunavik leaders discuss future of regional self-government

For years, people in the Northern Quebec region of Nunavik have been debating and discussing the creation of a new regional government. But last spring, voters rejected a self-government plan in a referendum.

Now eight months later, leaders have re-grouped. Last week they held a special three-day meeting to discuss Nunavik's political future.

Susan speaks with Pita Aatami, the president of Makivik corporation, who co-chaired the meetings last week.

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Political Panel

Quebec and Ottawa are squaring off over federal crime legislation. Meanwhile, the leader of the Coalition Avenir Québec, Francois Legault says the province's pension fund manager should be investing in mining companies.

Susan is joined by political panelist Rhéal Séguin of the Globe and Mail.

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Lieutenant Frederick Lenox Ingall's diary found

It's not every day someone finds their great great great grandfather's diary. It's even rarer that that relative of yours is an important historical figure, with a fort named after him. But that's what happened in 2010, when Lieutenant Frederick Lenox Ingall's diary was found.

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Last minute surgery cancellations in Sherbrooke

Our Eastern Townships reporter Alison Brunette met with Yves Paradis. The forty-year-old says he was put on a waiting list for surgery on a hernia for more than a year.at Sherbrooke's University Hospital. But Paradis says so far, the surgery has been cancelled three times - after he's already prepped, arrived at the hospital and waited outside the operating room.

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Quebec's Human Rights Commision questions new tax credit

Quebec's human rights commission has told Revenue Quebec that one of its policies is penalizing one of the very groups of people the government is supposedly trying to help. President Gaetan Cousineau explains.

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Chicken restaurant workers back on the job

Employees at the Roi du Coq Rôti in Sherbrooke are going back to work, after they were locked out for more than three and a half years.

Quebec AM's Alison Brunette brings us the story.

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Protest at Saint Augustine town council continues

Tension is rising in Saint Augustine. Protesters in the Lower North Shore village have been restricting access to municipal buildings for more than a month. They're upset with slow progress on building roads and a bridge over the Saint Augustine river, to link the village to the local airport. Now the province's municipalities commission has obtained a temporary injunction to get the protest shut down.

Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan brings us an update.

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SEPAQ drops lottery system for reservations

Grab your computer mouse or get your dialing fingers ready. As of November 25th, vacationers and sport fishermen who want to reserve a cabin or a trip in one of Quebec's parks or wildlife reserves will now book on a first come, first served basis.

Susan speaks with Jean Pagé, head of research for SÉPAQ, Quebec's provincial parks agency.

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Coalition Avenir Québec

Francois Legault says his new political party is neither left wing, nor right wing, neither sovereignist nor federalist.

Susan speaks with former ADQ and Canadian Alliance organizer Éric Duhaime about how the Coalition Avenir Québec fits in to Quebec's political landscape.

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Father says hearing-impaired girl not getting enough support from school

A man in the Eastern Townships says his hearing-impaired daughter has never gotten the support she needs from her school.

Our Townships reporter Alison Brunette brings us the story of Felisha Powers.

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Political Panel

Francois Legault is set to officially announce the creation of his new political party: The Coalition for Quebec's Future. Gilbert Lavoie of Le Soleil and Rhéal Séguin of the Globe and Mail join Susan to talk about how the party might change Quebec's political landscape.
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Homeowners still waiting on flood relief

It has been almost a year since the now famous high tide storm surge that hit Eastern Quebec last December.

The opposition PQ is criticizing the goverment for being too slow to provide relief money for homeowners. But Public Security Minister Robert Dutil says overall compensation files are moving along well.

The CBC's Susan Woodfine joins Susan for the first in a series of reports, in the lead up to the anniversary of the floods.

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Female munitions workers honoured

Credit: Nicholas Morant/National Film Board of Canada/ Library and Archives Canada.jpgParks Canada has unveiled a plaque in honour of women who manufactured munitions for the country's military. Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan visits the site of Canada's first federal munitions factories in Quebec City, and brings us the stories of some of those women.

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Minister responds to ferry contract controversy

The head of Groupe Maritime Verreault in Les Méchins is criticizing a Quebec government decision to award a ferry maintenance contract to a Nova Scotian shipyard.

Quebec AM's Glenn Wanamaker speaks with junior transport minister Norman MacMillan about the decision.

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Dr. Lin on head lice

They're a little bug that causes a lot of trouble for school children. Our regular health contributor Dr. Peter Lin talks with Susan about how to deal with head lice.
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Lingerie Football may soon touch down in Quebec

Short shorts. Bikini tops. Garters. Helmets. They're all a part of the uniform of women in the Lingerie Football League. The controversial North American league is looking to expand throughout Canada. Montreal and Quebec City could both soon have teams.

Quebec AM's Molly Thomas brings us the whole ten yards.

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Former soldier holds hunger strike

A former member of the Canadian Forces, Pascal Lacoste is holding a hunger strike. He's been camped out in front of the office of the Veterans Affairs minister, Steven Blaney in Lévis since Saturday (Nov 06, 2011). He claims he was exposed to depleted uranium, used in munitions during the war in Bosnia, and says it made him sick.

Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan speaks with Susan about Lacoste's hunger strike.

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Ainslie also spoke with three soldiers who are in Lévis to support Lacoste. Francois Meilleur and Winston Harris both say they suffer from the effects of depleted uranium. Robert Derosby says the government should be doing more to help soldiers with health issues. A warning: this tape contains strong language and some graphic descriptions.

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The Perfect Chili Contest

The temperature is dropping, and we're heading into football playoff season, so what better time is there for a steaming bowl of chili? Quebec AM wants to hear your perfect chili recipes.

Chilipic3.JPGSend them in:

CBC Golf Shirt2.JPGYou could win one of two stylish CBC golf shirts. They're both size men's XXL, and could make a great gift for your favourite chili cook.

For inspiration, here are some chili lovers in Edmonton sharing their thoughts on what makes the perfect bowl.

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Documentary "Trou Story" criticizes mining industry

The new documentary "Trou Story" from musician and environmentalist Richard Desjardins paints an unflattering picture of mining in Quebec.

Susan speaks with Christian Simard of the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine about the film.

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Susan also speaks with Bryan Coates, CFO of the mining company Osisko, who says the documentary does not portray how the mining industry works today.

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Quebec shipyard loses ferry maintenance contract

For years, Groupe Maritime Verreault in Les Méchins has done the maintenance on the Camille-Marcoux ferry, that runs between Baie-Comeau and Matane. But now, the provincial ferry authority, the STQ, has awarded the $2 million contract to the Irving Shipyards in Nova Scotia. STQ officials say Irving under-bid Verreault by $300 thousand.

Susan speaks with Denise Verreault about why she believes the contract should have stayed in Quebec.

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Political Panel

Rhéal Séguin of the Globe and Mail and Gilbert Lavoie of Le Soleil join Susan to talk about the newest political party on the block: The CAQ (Coalition pour l'Avenir du Québec).
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Occupons Quebec protesters defy order to dismantle camp

Friday morning at Occupons Quebec - photo by Julia CaronThe City of Quebec asked the protesters to leave the Occupons Quebec site yesterday. The protesters came to a unanimous decision to remain on site. CBC's Ainslie MacLellan and Kim Garrity were there last night, and bring us that story. Afterwards, Guy Wera, one of the protesters, joins us from the protest site.

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External links:

  • Occupy Quebec encampment remains - CBC News
  • Occupons Québec protesters may be asked to leave - Quebec AM
  • Malgré l'ultimatum, les indignes de Quebec refusent de quitter - Le Devoir
  • After the floods: psychological effects

    Marika Wheeler recently spent a few days on the ground in the Richelieu Valley, talking to victims of the spring flooding. We've heard about the property damage residents there have felt. Here, she brings us the stories of the emotional toll dealing with flood damage has left, and the lingering psychological effects.

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    Bullies on the bus

    Bullying doesn't only happen in the schoolyard or the cafeteria. For many students, the long ride to school can be daunting.

    As part of the series The Mean Years: Bullying in our Schools, we hear stories of intimidation on the school bus.

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    Some schools are turning to websites to try encourage people to speak out against bullying. Producer Kim Garritty speaks with Susan about the website StopaBully.ca. 

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    Residents divided over new housing development

    A planned housing project in the St. Jean Baptiste neighbourhood of Quebec City is raising controversy for being too tall.

    Quebec AM's Ainslie MacLellan tells us about a door-to-door campaign to force a referendum on the project.

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    Occupons Québec protesters may be asked to leave

    occupons qc.jpgThe Occupy Wall Street movement inspired fifty "indignés" to occupy Quebec - more specifically, to occupy part of Place de l'Université du Québec in the Saint-Roch neighbourhood. They have been camped out there since October 15th. It had been relatively uneventful - until a small fire happened Tuesday morning. Now, questions are being raised about safety in the protest camp.

    CBC's Julia Caron brings us that story.

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    Quebec lawyers help create Haiti justice centre

    After months of efforts to help rebuild Haiti's legal system, Lawyers Without Borders Canada is celebrating the opening of a new justice centre in Port-au-Prince. Susan speaks with Pascal Paradis, the executive director of the organization's Quebec City chapter.
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    Happy 75th birthday CBC!

    20101102_logo.jpgTo celebrate the 75th anniversary of CBC, we dipped back - way back - into the archives, and bring you a report from the humble beginnings of the network. Keep in mind, the tape reflects the times and may offend some listeners.

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    We also invited our listeners to share some of their memories.

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    Most of the Quebec AM team chime in with some of their memories as well. Here, Ainslie MacLellan and Julia Caron join Susan in studio to read some listener emails and share their own CBC memories.

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    Schoolyard taunts

    In the third part of our series The Mean Years: Bullying in our Schools, Eastern Townships correspondent Alison Brunette speaks with kids who have bullied about why they did it.

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    Alison also speaks with Susan about what schools are doing to address the problem.

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    Also in the series:

  • Sticks and Stones - Quebec AM (October 31, 2011)
  • Mean Girls - Quebec AM (November 1, 2011)

    You can find the whole series at www.cbc.ca/quebecam/bullying

  • Shale gas consultations

    It's been all quiet on the shale gas front since last spring. That's when the province's environmental review board, the BAPE, recommended the province halt all exploration until it could do a proper evaluation. That evaluation has arrived. It's called the Strategic Environmental Assessment, and the public is being asked to participate.

    Quebec AM's Glenn Wanamaker spoke with Robert Joly, chair of the evaluation committee.

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    The Association against Atmospheric Pollution is critical of the make-up of the evaluation committee. Glenn spoke with president André Belisle.

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    Canada's electronic health records called an "Epic Fail"

    About seventeen years after Canadian politicians first began discussing electronic medical records, most clinics and hospitals are still buried in paperwork. According to journalist Paul Webster, this leaves some patients' lives hanging in the balance.

    Susan speaks with Webster about his article in the November edition of Readers' Digest, called "Health Care's Epic Fail."

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    Decriminalization of prostitution

    A recent Ontario Superior Court decision and the B.C. inquiry into the murders committed by Robert Pickton have rekindled the debate on decriminalizing prostitution.

    But some former prostitutes, and organizations that support them say the move wouldn't protect sex workers from violence.

    Our Ainslie MacLellan speaks with some of the women in the Quebec documentary, L'Imposture. It tackles some of those legal issues, and sheds light on the hidden faces of prostitution.

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    Upcoming screening for L'Imposture:

    • When: Thursday, November 10th, 2011
    • Where: Tam Tam Café, at the corner of Boulevard Langelier and Boulevard Charest in Quebec City.
    • Time: 7:30 pm

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    Mean Girls

    As part of our series The Mean Years: Bullying in our Schools, Eastern Townships correspondent Alison Brunette brings us the stories of two girls who were picked on, threatened and shunned by their peers. She also gives us a look at the latest research on how girls express their aggression differently than boys.

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