CBC.ca | Quebec AM

October 2011 Archives

Political Panel

Rhéal Séguin of the Globe and Mail and Gilbert Lavoie of Le Soleil join Susan to talk about division in the Parti Quebecois, and whether Gilles Duceppe could be waiting in the wings to take over the party from Pauline Marois.
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Sticks and Stones

Young people who've been the targets of bullying share their stories with the CBC's Alison Brunette, as part of a new series: The Mean Years : Bullying in our Schools. A warning for parents with young children: some of the language and content is disturbing.

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Director Philippe Falardeau talks about his new film Monsieur Lazhar

monsieur-lazhar-23033-1932428628.jpgA while back, Philippe Falardeau went to the theatre... and he came out with a movie. The play was "Bashir Lazhar" by Evelyne de la Chenelliere. It's the story of an Algerian immigrant who steps in to teach a Grade 6 class in a school in downtown Montreal, after a teacher commits suicide.

Falardeau joins Susan to talk about his latest film, which is already receiving wide critical acclaim.

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Public Security Minister promises flood victims faster financial aid

Richelieu ValleyCBC's roving reporter Marika Wheeler was in the Richelieu Valley earlier this month. Here is her report into the hurdles people affected by the floods are encountering when trying to access government relief.

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Public Security Minister Robert Dutil responds.

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For a full-length version of Marika Wheeler's interview with Robert Dutil, click here.

Marika Wheeler's full interview with Robert Dutil

Some impatient flood victims in the Richelieu valley and eastern Quebec should start receiving government cheques soon. Many people in those regions say they don't have enough money to begin repairs for flood damage suffered several months ago. In an interview with CBC's Marika Wheeler, Public security minister Robert Dutil says that will soon change.

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Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques' underwater escape

astronaut.jpgA team of NASA astronauts is back on dry land, after an underwater adventure off the coast of Florida. The astronauts were on a mission at an undersea facility called Aquarius. They were forced to return to the surface, because they were right in the path of Hurricane Rina. Canadian astronaut David Saint Jacques, of Quebec City, tells us about his adventure.

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Justice professionals criticize federal crime bill

Criminologists, social workers, psychologists and other professionals in the justice field came together this week to voice their concerns about the new Federal crime bill. Bill C-10 will introduce new mandatory minimum sentences for some violent crimes and drug offenses, and will open the door for more violent youth offenders to be tried as adults.

But critics say the bill focuses too much on incarceration and will not actually reduce crime. Susan speaks with Hirsch Greenberg, member of the Canadian Criminal Justice Association.

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Learning a third language

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We've heard about the challenges of learning English as a second language, but what about taking on a third? CBC's Julia Caron visited a Mandarin class at St. Patrick's high school.

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What happens if everyone becomes bilingual?

What happens if everyone in Quebec becomes bilingual? CBC's Julia Caron and Molly Thomas start asking that question in the streets of St-Roch and Limoilou. Afterwards, you'll hear CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon has been asking that question, and we'll hear the answers. To end off, we hear from Mathieu Campagna. He wonders about the potential cultural impact in Quebec if everyone speaks English.
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Gun control debate

The Federal Conservative government has introduced new legislation that would abolish Canada's long gun registry.

Susan speaks with Conservative senator Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu about why he supports the move.

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Gun control advocates, women's groups and opposition MPs are denouncing the move to scrap the registry.

Heidi Rathjen was a civil engineering student at École Polytechnique in Montreal in 1989, when Marc Lépine shot and killed 14 women at the school. She's since become a vocal advocate for gun control. She explains why she thinks the registry should be maintained.

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Dunham town council placed under trusteeship

Shouting matches. Dysfunctional meetings. Distrust. The conflict between the mayor and town councillors in Dunham has gotten so bad, that the province has placed the municipality under trusteeship.

Susan speaks with Dunham mayor Jean-Guy Demers about why he asked the province to step in.

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Wildcat strikes hit Quebec construction sites

Construction workers could be off the job all week at sites across the province. The workers are protesting a bill which would allow the government to place non-unionized workers on construction sites. We speak to Yves-Thomas Dorval, president of the Quebec Employer's Council, an association that opposes the workers' actions. We also hear from two companies affected by the strikes, RioTintoAlcan and ArcelorMittal. 

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Doping scandal rocks Quebec cycling

This week two Quebec cyclists from l'Équipe Louis Garneau admitted to using the performance enhancing drug EPO.

We hear reaction from cyclist David Veilleux, of Cap Rouge, who is a professional rider in Europe with the Europcar team.

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Bilingualism and parenting

parentspanel.JPGIt's an important choice: which school system do you send your child through if you want him or her to have the best possible foundation for both English and French? Over the past week, we have heard many voices from the front lines of language education: from the schoolyard to the classroom. But the most important decision about language is likely made at the kitchen table, as parents decide the best options for their children. 

We hear from parents who have a variety of options and have made different choices. Francis Brault, Chantal Jura, Sylvestre Pinette and Dolores del Rio share their experiences with us. We begin with Francis.

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Ministry of Education: Bilingualism

Continuing with our English 101: Bilingualism in la Belle Province series: St-Lawrence and Garneau cégep students and their teachers talk about learning English, what it means, and how it's being taught in Québec.
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Quebec's ministry of education, Line Beauchamp, on Intensive English, and why the province will soon make it mandatory for all Grade Six students.
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Political Panel: Liberal convention

The Political Panel joins Susan to talk about the past week in politics. Rheal Seguin is the Globe and Mail Bureau Chief in Quebec City. Gilbert Lavoie is political columnist for Le Soleil.
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Contest: best bilingual blunders

We've been holding a contest as we broadcast our English 101: Becoming Bilingual in La Belle Province series. We've received dozens of entries on our Facebook page and via email. Here are a few we've shared on the air this week.

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The stories you heard were from: Bill Russell, Jessica Richards-Ludgate, Stuart McKelvie, Louise Beaudoin, Nathan Gurel and Julie Martineau

You can share your story with us in a number of ways:

Five lucky winners will receive a 75th anniversary t-shirt. We await your bilingual bijoux!

Grade 6: Intensive English

The province wants all Grade Sixers to spend half the school year speaking English: We hear how that works at L'École de l'Accueil in Quebec City.
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CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon in conversation with Susan Campbell about the pros and cons of the 'Intensive English' program the province wants to bring in across the board by 2017.

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Ballast water regulations

Stricter water rules out of New York state could cost tens-of-thousands of jobs in Canada, and potentially account for billions of dollars in lost revenue. Gerry Carter, the president of Canada Steamship Lines, speaks to us about his concerns over the proposed regulations.

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Libyan-Quebecers react to Gaddafi's death

Libyans around the world began to celebrate as news of Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi's death emerged Thursday morning. We spoke to two Libyan-Quebecers about their reaction to his death.

Ahmed Al Maghrawi is a software engineer based in Montreal. Hala Ezalouk is studying building engineering at Concordia University.

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English 101: In the classroom

If more francophones who have the right to an English education are using it, how does that play out in the English system? CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon brings us the stories of students from Francophone families about their experience going to school at Everest Elementary. We also hear from Stephen Burke, the chair of the Council of Commissioners of the Central Quebec School Board.
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Parents' Choice: Everest Elementary

EverestRandom (3).JPGOnly those who have the right can send their children to school in English. What goes into making that decision?

We'll hear from parents of children at Everest Elementary, as well as principal Micheline Gagné. CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon brings us those stories.

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Davie Shipyard shut out of major shipbuilding contracts

Three major Canadian shipyards were bidding for two major shipbuilding contracts announced Wednesday afternoon. As the winning bids were announced, Halifax's Irving and Vancouver's Seaspan shipyards celebrated, while Davie Shipyard in Levis was left empty handed.

What does this mean for the embattled shipyard? To explain what's next, John Dewar is vice-president of Strategic Services of Upper Lakes Marine and one of the owners of Davie Canada. Ann Gingras, the regional president of the CSN which represents the Davie workers, also tells us about the impact on workers.

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Long-awaited inquiry into Quebec's construction industry

Quebec Premier Jean Charest called an inquiry on corruption in the construction industry Wednesday. Maude Cohen, President of the Quebec order of Engineers, was one of the many people calling this inquiry. She tells Susan Campbell about her expectations and concerns.
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Former Liberal MNA for Orford and the former president of the Quebec Liberal party, Robert Benoit, reacts to the announcement of a long-awaited inquiry into allegations of corruption in the construction industry.

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Camp Immersion

holiday-centre-la-grande-aventure-en-anglais-229343345.jpgCBC reporter Catou MacKinnon meets a woman who believes so strongly in bilingualism that she bought a summer camp to make it happen.

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Flood victims in the Richelieu Valley voice their frustrations

richelieu valley house on stilts - photo credit: marika wheeler

Some flood victims in the Richelieu valley say they are tired of getting the run-around.

They say they've been trying to get help from the Civil Security for months and now they don?t know what to do anymore.

CBC's Marika Wheeler brings us some of the voices of emotional residents during a meeting earlier this week.

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Canadian Wheat Board changes: impact in Quebec

The days of the Canadian Wheat Board appear to be numbered. This issue may seem miles away for people in Quebec, but some experts say that people in the grain industry should be wary of that perception. As a major port city, Quebec City in particular might feel some of the larger repercussions of these changes. Ramzy Yelda, the director of Market Analysis at the Union of Agricultural Producers, explains the situation.

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What to expect from this year's flu season

Roll up your sleeves everyone: the flu shot season is just around the corner. Our health columnist Dr. Lin brings us a report on this year's soon-to-be prominent strains...and whether any of them will wreak H1N1-style havoc.

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English 101: What to expect

Here at Quebec AM, we've decided to explore the reality of bilingualism in the everyday lives of people living in Quebec City. Unlike Montreal, you don't hear English every day here.

CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon gives us a preview of what we'll be hearing over the next week or so. We'll be hearing some most of her reports here on Quebec AM, and also over at our afternoon show, Breakaway.

Part 1:
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Part 2:
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What is English for?

EverestRandom (1).JPGAt Everest school in Quebec City, a whole new crew of 5-year-olds is learning English for the very first time. The kicker? They are all from French families.

Outside of Montreal, many parents who have the right are choosing English schools to encourage and ensure bilingualism. In our series, English 101, we hear the voices of those children. Here's what happened when CBC reporter Catou MacKinnon visited Miss Parkinson's kindergarten class at Everest School.

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High-speed rail lines in Canada

A long-awaited study has found that a high-speed rail line from Quebec City to Toronto would benefit the Canadian economy. We hear from Paul Langan, President of High Speed Rail Canada, who says it's time Canada started building its first bullet train.
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Brooms in the National Assembly

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Around the same time as Liberal MNA's in Jean Charest's government will be having a caucus meeting, members of the organization Génération d'idées will be outside the National Asembly. They've organized a political-artistic event to highlight why they think such an inquiry is needed. They've come equipped with brooms. Paul St-Pierre Plamondon is the president of Génération d'idées.
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Looking back on English in Quebec City

Language is the main way we communicate with each other, the way we function in society, and frequently the way we identify ourselves. In Quebec, language has been a central theme of what it means to live in this province. Quebec society is becoming increasingly bilingual, especially for Francophones seeking to learn English.

This week we begin a series called English 101. We wanted to understand the reality of bilingualism as it's lived by people here in Quebec City. Susan sat down over coffee at Cafe Krieghoff on rue Cartier -- a traditional meeting place in Quebec City --  with two women who have seen language change gradually over time in their city.

Joanne Coleman-Robertson is recently retired from St Lawrence College where she worked for 35 years, most recently worked as an academic advisor. Gina Farnell is vice principal at Quebec High School, where she has worked for 30 years.
       
Here is part 1 of that conversation:
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Part 2:
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Promo Plastik Workers' Cooperative

We're used to seeing "Made In China" stamped on many promotional objects and souvenirs. The assumption is that it is much cheaper to do so. But as we'll hear from Promo Plastik, a small workers' cooperative in St-Jean-Port-Joli, that's not always the case. Listen to how small manufacturers, like Promo Plastik, can compete with low-cost factories overseas.
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Political Panel: a look at leaders

Jean Charest has been facing a lot of questions about whether or not his government will call an inquiry into corruption in the construction industry. Meanwhile, Francois Legault's coalition is rumoured to soon evolve into a fully fledged political party come November.

It's a tale of two leaders. Gilbert Lavoie, political columnist for Le Soleil, and Rheal Seguin, Globe and Mail's bureau chief in Quebec City, take a look at their potential political fortunes.
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Competition in the paving industry: Enquête

Radio-Canada's program Enquête has taken a look at how the paving industry works. A team decided to focus on one area of the province: the lower St Lawrence and Gaspé peninsula. Elected officials have long complained that there was an absence of competition in the area when it came to paving. CBC's Nancy Wood works with the Enquête team.
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Democracy Now's Amy Goodman in Quebec City

amy-aug2006.jpgWorld renowned investigative journalist and host of Democracy Now! Amy Goodman talks to Susan about the Occupy Wall Street protests and her speech at the North American Conference of Worker Co-operatives in Quebec City.

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Val d'Or Housing

CBC's Molly Thomas brings us the stories of people in Val D'or who are struggling to find housing in light of a growing housing shortage.

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Potential safe injection site in Quebec

After a Supreme Court decision in favour of Vancouver's Insite, Quebec's Health Minister is calling for proposals for supervised injection sites in Quebec City and Montreal. In Quebec City, Point de reperes is considering a pilot project for the lower town.

CBC's Catou MacKinnon met up with Nancy Trudel yesterday to talk about supervised injection sites. Here is some of their conversation.

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We also sent CBC's Julia Caron down to Saint-Roch to ask what people think of a potential pilot project in that neighbourhood.

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Non-profit palliative care residence in Levis

CBC's Molly Thomas takes us on a visit of a new non-profit palliative care residence in Levis. It is currently under construction, but organizers hope to have it open by the end of November.

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Environmental concerns over Plan Nord promises

Many environmentalists are raising concerns over the ways in which the Quebec government has promised to ensure the protection of 50% of the forests involved in Plan Nord. One of those concerned is Valerie Courtois, a Senior Advisor on Aboriginal Relations for the Canadian Boreal Initiative. She is also an Innu of the Mashteuiatsh nation. 

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Construction union reaction to Bill 33

Reaction to the proposed provincial government's Bill 33 has been swift. The two major construction unions are butting heads over stripping unions of the right to decide which workers get access to job sites. Donald Fortin is the director-general of Le Conseil des métiers de la construction, and here he is in conversation with Susan Campbell. 

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New jobs and hope in Lebel-sur-Quevillon

Jobs and optimism are returning to the northwestern town of Lebel-sur-Quevillon. Just three years ago, the future of the town looked bleak: Domtar had announced the closure of its pulp & paper mill, which employed nearly a third of the town's population.

But this year, people are talking about a renaissance. The nearby Langlois zinc mine is gearing up for a return to full operation, paired with growing confidence that the old pulp mill will follow shortly after.

Greg Bussières' recent life has mirrored that of the town...losing his job in forestry, and finding a new one in mining. He tells Susan about that journey.

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Land owners react to potential mining exploration in North Hatley

The town of North Hatley had a public information meeting in response to a potential mining claim. Nearly sixty people attended the meeting, and all of them were opposed to any mining exploration. Two land owners who attended the meeting, Hillary Webster and Jason Stafford, tell their story.

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Proposed toll bridge replacement for Champlain

The federal government announced a 10-year plan for the building of a new Champlain Bridge yesterday. Two mayors from the South Shore, the Mayor of St. Lambert, Philippe Brunet and the Mayor of Brossard, Paul Leduc react to the announcement.

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Simon Prevost, the president of the Quebec Manufacturers and Exporters association, also shares his thoughts on the proposed toll bridge plan.

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Gapesie human less

gaspesie.JPGHundreds of abandonned houses litter the coastal landscape along route 132, the longest highway in Quebec. Photographers Guillaume D. Cyr and Yana Ouellet decided to document fifty of those houses for their project Gaspesie human less. CBC's Julia Caron headed out to the gallery L'Etabli to find out more. 

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Is sickness sexist?

With cold and flu season just around the corner, you might be thinking of ways to fight off those illnesses. But according to a growing body of research, some illnesses may have a gender bias. Dr. Peter Lin joins Susan to explain why sickness may be sexist.

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Shipbuilding contracts: Davie's bid

Three Canadian shipyards are vying for the contracts to build combat and non-combat ships for the federal government. The contracts are worth billions, and the new owners of the Davie yard in Lévis have high hopes. CBC's Glenn Wanamaker brings us that story.

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Revisiting the tragedy at CFB Valcartier

In 1974, an accidental explosion of a live grenade at CFB Valcartier cadet camp killed 6 boys and injured 54. Two of those cadets injured, Colin Caldwell and Paul Wheeler, share their story with Susan Campbell.

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Shipbuilding contract: Halifax bid

Three Canadian ship yards are being considered by Ottawa for the designation of ship building centers of excellence. It's believed only two will share in the large multi-billion dollar contracts that will build a new ship a year over the next three decades.

For the province of Nova Scotia and the Halifax Ship Yard, it's a high stakes decision with big implications. The CBC's Rob North brings us that story.

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Shipbuilding contract: Vancouver's Seaspan bid

seaspan shipyard.jpgThe federal government is getting ready to award a total of 35-billion dollars worth of new shipbuilding contracts. Three shipyards have filed a bid: the Irving Yard in Halifax, the Davie shipyard in Lévis, and Seaspan in British Columbia. This week on Quebec AM, we're going to hear stories from each of those communities including details of the history, the high stakes and the politics involved in the bids.

In Vancouver, the hope is that Seaspan will win out. But as the CBC's Manusha Janakiram found out that hope is shrouded in a history of disappointment.

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Political panel discusses HST

On Friday, Prime Minister Harper and Premier Charest finally announced a deal that gives Quebec $2.2 billion as compensation for the costs involved in harmonizing the two sales taxes. Will it change the tone of relations between Ottawa and Quebec City? Our political panel Gilbert Lavoie and Rheal Seguin discuss.

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