Yarn-wrapped letters
Ages:
all

Crafts

Yarn-Wrapped Initials

Mar 12, 2019

These yarn-wrapped initials are easy to make, and a fun piece of art for kids to display on a shelf or bedroom wall. They make a great gift for a friend, too! Your kids can make one initial, a set or their whole name using this process. It’s a fun sensory craft and great for strengthening co-ordination and fine motor skills.

Completed yarn-wrapped letters

My hooligans have enjoyed crafting with yarn from the time they were toddlers. We have quite a large collection and they've always loved rummaging through it to pick out the perfect colour and texture to craft with.

We’ve done dozens of yarn-wrapping crafts over the years, making everything from Christmas ornaments to homemade dolls. Most of these projects have been fairly small, using just scraps of yarn, but recently, we made a much bigger yarn project, and it was a huge hit with all of the kids.

Little girl holding her completed

Each of them made the first initial of their name in the form of a one-foot-tall cardboard letter, wrapped entirely in yarn.

When I was a tween, one of my friends used to make sets of big hand-painted styrofoam initials to give as gifts. I think all of the girls in our group got a set for our birthdays one year. I loved mine and had them displayed on my bedroom wall for years.


You'll Also Love: Simple And Colourful Chalk Marker Bookmarks


I thought it would be cool for the hooligans to make something similar to display in their bedrooms, but unfortunately, I didn’t have any styrofoam. I did, however, have cardboard, and to make our letters textured and interesting, we used yarn to cover them instead of paint.

They were really fun to make and the kids were so excited with the way they turned out!


What You'll Need:

  • cardboard
  • acrylic paint (optional)
  • yarn
  • tape
  • glue or glue gun (optional)

How It's Made:

To begin, draw your letters on a sturdy piece of cardboard and cut them out.

Little girl painting a cardboard

Note: If your child isn’t going to cover their letter entirely with yarn, they can paint their initial first so the paint colour peeks through where the yarn doesn’t cover the cardboard.

Wrapping the painted

Next, cut a long length of yarn and get wrapping! You can tape the starting piece to the back of the cardboard or simply trap it under the yarn as you wrap. To add a new colour or more of the same colour, tape the loose end to the back of the letter and begin to repeat the process with a new piece of yarn.

Rainbow yarn covering part of an

Tip: For letters with sharp angles — like “T," “L” and “H,” for example — it’s easier to keep the yarn running in the same direction for the entire letter than to switch directions when the line of the letter does. You can see with our letter “L” how we wrapped the whole letter horizontally to avoid dealing with that pesky corner.

Yarn-wrapped letters

If necessary, use a little glue or a glue gun to secure the yarn along the edges of the letter.

For a nice touch, you can use a chunky yarn to outline your initial or to cover any visible cut edges.

Yarn-wrapped letters

Encourage your child to use a variety of colours and textures for the most interest and for a wonderful sensory experience.

What a terrific piece of personalized art for a child to display in their room!

Article Author Jackie Currie
Jackie Currie

Read more from Jackie here.

Jackie Currie is a mother, daycare provider, and the creative spirit behind the blog Happy Hooligans. A self-proclaimed glitterphobe, she specializes in easy, affordable arts & crafts and good, old-fashioned play.

Add New Comment

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.