Vibrant rorschach window hearts
Share
Ages:
all

Crafts

Rorschach Window Hearts Art Project

Feb 10, 2017

Life has been challenging and recently I had a serious case of the blues.

So I pulled out our brightest paint. I found our largest white paper. I knew I wanted to do something with the kids, but it had to be something mindlessly simple. I started drawing hearts, lots of hearts, and suddenly realized I wanted to (even strangely had to) cover the front windows of our house with painted hearts.

My kids are still too young to understand what’s happening in the world right now, but I figured they aren’t too young to feel the power of colour. The power of art-making. The importance of joy. The initial plan was to simply disrupt winter’s bleakness. I told the kids we were going to broadcast good vibes from the front porch (and they were thrilled).

My kids are still too young to understand what’s happening in the world right now, but I figured they aren’t too young to feel the power of colour. The power of art-making. The importance of joy.

We painted for about an hour and ended up with wall-to-wall hearts drying across the main floor. By the time we ran out of paint we had so many hearts we didn’t know what to do with them! The kids decided they wanted to bring some hearts to school the next day to pass around, and they also decided they wanted to make a few “get well” cards for some of their sick friends.

I realized the seemingly insignificant act of decorating our front windows was turning into something a lot more important. We started talking about love, empathy and kindness. We talked about spontaneity, art-making and gift-giving. We talked about decorating the front of our house not just for us, but for our neighbours too. We also set aside some hearts to make thank you cards down the road.

It was beautiful to see the kids excited about what they had created. I taped up all the hearts, and felt the magic too. I also finally got some work done!

That evening, the kids and I were standing in front of the house when two neighbours stopped by — at the appropriate distance — to tell us how much they loved the hearts. The kids were beaming with pride. A few hours later, my son Hugo stopped at the bottom of the stairs before bedtime and said, “Mommy, now we live in the heart house!”  It was just what I needed to hear.

These hearts are a minor antidote to all the news — all the indecency — but they’re a great way to teach our young children how to share joy with others (and also remind us to make some room for a little arty self-care too). It’s also a perfect activity for Valentine’s Day!

You Will Need:

Colourful IKEA paints

  • Thick paint (IKEA sells incredibly vibrant acrylic paints and these are recommended, but any paint with a heavy body will work)
  • Large white paper
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Tape

Instructions:

1. Fold paper in half and draw half a heart so the folded edge represents the centreline of a full heart.

2. Cut out the half-heart through both layers of folded paper. Once done, open your paper to reveal your full heart. You can also just paint full sheets of paper, let them dry, then cut the hearts out from the full sheets (this is less messy, but it takes a bit longer to get to the heart part).


You'll Also Love: Colourful Tie-Dyed Heart Suncatchers


3. Add lines, dots, squiggles and other paint marks to one side of your open heart. 

Plain white paper hearts with paint squiggles.

4. Once done, fold the heart once again to squish and spread the paint between both sides. Kids love smoothing both sides of the paper together, and then opening the heart to reveal the new fun art.

A colourful roschach heart

5. Let your hearts dry, then tape up in your windows!

Rorschach hearts hanging on front door.

Window and door decorated with rorschach hearts.

 


On a final note, when I shared this story on Facebook, three of my friends immediately made hearts for their front windows too. Big hearts. Small hearts. Sharpie hearts. Post-it note hearts. 

Spread the love. 

Article Author TYLER CLARK BURKE
TYLER CLARK BURKE

TYLER CLARK BURKE is an artist, writer, illustrator, and freelance brainstormer. In her past life, she co-founded indie record label Three Gut Records; hosted huge art-music parties on Captain John’s Seafood Ship; imported miracle berries; and contributed art and design to various Canadian musicians. Now, the mother of two young children, Tyler is busy working on her second picture book about two globe-trotting beavers. Her first book, Bill Bowerbird and the Unbearable Beak-Ache (Owlkids) is now available on Amazon! You can find Tyler on Instagram and Twitter all too often. 

Add New Comment

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.