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My Father Was Executed For His Beliefs and I’m Passing His Values Down to My Granddaughter

Aug 9, 2019

What comes out of loss?

It's different for everyone. 

Mourning, for sure, in your own way and whichever form that takes. And immediately, you'll probably face a flood of emotions and memories. But over time, in remembering those loved and lost, as you put together the puzzle that is their lives, you really begin to get a sense of how greatly they impacted your life.

It's OK to grab a tissue — loss is hard, no matter how natural it is. 

But it's in understanding a person for who they were that will allow us to pass down their stories, their memories and the guiding principles that inspired everyone around them.

In the video above, Fari talks about sharing her father's Baha'i values with her granddaughter Aundia, a young artist who is following in the footsteps of Fari's father, a cardiologist — and natural artist — who was executed during the Iranian revolution. 


More Episodes: Check out the rest of The Art of Parenting here.


Full Transcript:

"As parents, you’re always busy with work. Busy looking after your children and everything. You don’t know what to do — you don’t really see them properly. Your children; growing up.

But as grandparents, you can sit back and look at them and in your own way, slowly teach them something with calmness and quietness.

Really enjoy them. But slowly guide them, showing them your love and support.

I have seven grandchildren. Aundia is a very artistic child. Loves her art.

[I remember] I was about 13 years of age, so my father one summer bought me all the tools for oil painting. My father was a physician. A heart cardiologist — a heart specialist.

But he suddenly started in one summer without having done any artwork — he produced many artworks. He suddenly became a real artist.

My father, he was a member of the Baha'i faith. During the revolution, the Iranian revolution, he was taken into prison. The Baha'is were under a lot of persecution at the time. My father was in prison because of ideas we are trying to bring into the world [today].

I’m very grateful to him for what he trained me in — to know how to love people. My father didn’t have any political involvement or anything — he was a a physician and serving. After 18 months, they executed him. He gave his life for what he believed in, which was the unity of humankind.

[Aundia's] great grandfather was an artist, so she was really interested. Exposing the child to the nature, to the art, painting, the music that you hear and everything together helps [her] spirit to grow.

This is what I’ve learned from my parents which I’m very, very grateful to, and I hope that I’ve been able to convey that to my children and they in turn to their own children.”


The Art of Parenting offers an intimate conversation with some of the most memorable families featured in the CBC Kids broadcast series The Art Show. The parents speak candidly and emotionally about how their own history, upbringing, belief system and circumstances that have influenced their parenting style and resulted in the raising of some truly phenomenal kids.

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