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WHAT IS RBC TRAINING GROUND?

RBC Training Ground is a talent identification and athlete funding program designed to uncover athletes with Olympic potential and provide them with the high-performance sport resources they need to achieve their podium dreams.

WHY RBC TRAINING GROUND?

With the belief that high performance sport should be accessible to all athletes that are talented, qualified and have the will to compete, this program travels the country every year searching for athletes that will fuel the Canadian Olympic pipeline with future talent.

RBC is committed to supporting up to 30 RBC Training Ground athletes every year, to assist them in chasing their Olympic dreams.

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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Why is the age range 14 to 25 years?
    The age range of 14 to 25 years aligns with long-term athlete development stages and the Canadian Sport for Life program. This age range allows us to capture those early- and late-stage Olympic potential athletes. The probability of identifying an athlete below or above these age ranges, within our current RBC Training Ground partner sports, is very small.
  • Does RBC Training Ground visit all provinces and major cities across the country?
    RBC Training Ground is committed to giving athletes all across Canada the opportunity to participate, knowing there may be undiscovered and talented athletes around the country. The schedule changes every year, and we look forward to creating even more opportunity to bring RBC Training Ground to even more communities in the future.
  • How do I/does my child compare against the performance benchmarks?
    Each sport requires different skills and the performance benchmarks are dictated by our NSO partners, each taking age and gender into account. Athletes that participate in a RBC Training Ground event will receive a custom scorecard the week after they participate, which will help them compare their performance against our benchmarks. Benchmarks can be viewed under the ‘Testing’ section of the website.
  • Which sports are recruiting new athletes through the RBC Training Ground program?
    There are 9 National sport organization (NSO) partners involved with the RBC Training Ground program for the 2020 season.
    • Boxing Canada
    • Canoe Kayak Canada
    • Cycling Canada
    • Freestyle Canada
    • Nordic Combined Ski Canada
    • Rowing Canada
    • Rugby Canada
    • SKi Jumping Canada
    • Speed Skating Canada
  • How many athletes are tested?
    Thousands of Canadians across the country participate in RBC Training Ground each year. We have tested over 8,000 athletes in the first four years of the program.
  • How long will a RBC Training Ground event take?
    Athletes should expect to be at the event for approximately 2 hours after their registered start time. During this time, athletes will register, complete basic anthropometry measurements (height, weight, arm span) before the testing begins. Athletes will then be tested in pre-determined waves based on selected registration times.
  • Can parents and/or coaches come and watch RBC Training Ground qualifying events?
    Yes, there will be separate seating available for spectators to watch the events; however, spectators will not be allowed on the field of play.
  • Do I need to book my own hotel or flight to attend an RBC Training Ground qualifying event?
    RBC Training Ground is not responsible for any travel costs associated with attending a local qualifying event, but will cover all travel and accommodations of those top 100 athletes selected to attend the National Final.
  • What happens after I/my child attends an RBC Training Ground event?
    After competing at an RBC Training Ground event, athletes may be contacted by one of our NSO partners and invited to attend a sport-specific testing session. Based on performances from the regional qualifying events, and sport-specific testing, the top 100 athletes from across Canada will be invited to attend the RBC Training Ground National Final event, which will be hosted in May 2020.
  • How are you selecting those who attend the RBC Training Ground National Final?
    Coaches and talent identification representatives from the participating National Sport organizations, and the Canadian Olympic and Paralympic Sport Institute Network (COPSIN), will select athletes based on a combination of athlete performances at the qualifying events and the sport-specific testing sessions. NSO’s are looking for athletes who met or exceeded the predetermined benchmarks set by each of the sports.
  • What happens after the National Final? Will sport organizations reach out to athletes they are interested in directly?
    Up to 30 athletes from across the country will be selected as RBC Future Olympians. The applicable NSO will receive funding assistance that will be used towards the RBC Future Olympians’ travel, competition and training camp expenses, coaching, nutrition, etc., but is the sole discretion of the applicable NSO. These funds will be administered by the Canadian Olympic Foundation to the select NSO directly. The RBC Training Ground team will reach out to all athletes who attend the National Final with more information after the Final is complete.
  • Is RBC Training Ground open to potential Para athletes as well?
    At this time, we are focused on finding the next generation of athletes with Olympic potential. Para sport has different requirements for their athletes based on the different classifications and ability categories within each discipline.
  • How has RBC committed to building the Olympic movement in Canada?
    The Olympic Games represent excellence, teamwork, diversity and commitment - the same values that hold true for RBC, its employees, clients and communities. That connection is a major reason why RBC has continued to represent as Team Canada’s longest-standing corporate partner since 1947. This commitment to the Olympic movement can be seen through the RBC Olympians program, as well as through its support for the next generation of Olympic hopefuls.
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Testing

Athletes are assessed using field based tests that indicate Speed, Strength, Power and Endurance capabilities.

National Sport Organizations (NSO’s) use combinations of these tests to differentiate between performances within their sport of interest. The following tests have been carefully selected by coaches and talent identification representatives, as the results will provide insight towards potential performance within a given sport. Each sport requires different physical abilities, and skills, and therefore performance benchmarks vary by NSO. Each field based assessment result used must be viewed within the context of the requirements of the sport, the characteristics of the athlete, and the stage of their development.

QUALIFYING EVENTS

Open call to all aspiring athletes aged 14 to 25.

40/30M SPRINT

SPEED

40/30M SPRINT
The 40m sprint is a test to measure an athlete’s speed and sprinting ability. The athlete starts from a two-point stance, behind a first set of timing lights. The test begins as soon as the athlete breaks the laser between the first set of timing lights. The test measures an athlete’s time from 0-10m, 30-40m and 0-40m.

Regional Qualifier Performance Benchmarks

Age
Developing
Below Avg
Avg
Above Avg
Excellent
Male 14-18.5 yrs
>4.9
4.8-4.4
4.4-4.2
4.19-3.78
<3.77
Male >18.5 yrs
>4.8
4.7-4.36
4.35-4.09
4.08-3.73
<3.72
Female 14-18 yrs
>5.52
5.51-4.96
4.95-4.58
4.57-4.05
<4.04
Female >18.5 yrs
>5.52
5.51-4.95
4.94-4.57
4.56-4.10
<4.09

ISOMETRIC MID-THIGH PULL (IMTP)

STRENGTH

ISOMETRIC MID-THIGH PULL (IMTP)
The isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP) is a key test used to measure an athlete’s full body strength. The athlete stands on the force plate, gripping the bar as if to perform a deadlift. The athlete then pushes through their feet to exert as much force through the handle of the IMTP instrument. The force output is observed and recorded.

Regional Qualifier Performance Benchmarks

Age
Developing
Below Avg
Avg
Above Avg
Excellent
Male 14-18.5 yrs
<69
70-134
135-178
179-245
>246
Male >18.5 yrs
<105
106-169
170-217
218-290
>291
Female 14-18 yrs
<52
53-93
94-123
124-168
>169
Female >18.5 yrs
<58
59-109
110-149
150-207
>208

VERTICAL JUMP

POWER

VERTICAL JUMP
The vertical jump is a classic measure of an athlete’s lower-body power. Using a countermovement (knees bent) and arm swing, the athlete jumps as high as they can from the jump mat and lands with soft knees.

Regional Qualifier Performance Benchmarks

Age
Developing
Below Avg
Avg
Above Avg
Excellent
Male 14-18.5 yrs
<41.1
41.2-58.5
58.6-70
71-88
>89
Male >18.5 yrs
<45
45.1-64.6
64.7-79.6
79.7-101.7
>101.8
Female 14-18 yrs
<33.4
33.5-46.9
47.0-56.1
56.2-69.8
>69.9
Female >18.5 yrs
<31.5
31.6-47.2
47.3-57.8
57.9-73.7
>73.8

20M MULTI-STAGE SHUTTLE RUN (BEEP TEST)

ENDURANCE

20M MULTI-STAGE SHUTTLE RUN (BEEP TEST)
The 20m multi-stage shuttle run, commonly referred to as the beep test, is a tool to measure an athlete’s aerobic capacity. Athletes run 20m from line to line before or at the 'beep' on the CD track. As the athlete advances in the test the 'beeps' get closer and closer together. The test is over when the athlete can no longer get to the line before the 'beep' sounds twice in a row. Athletes must pivot at the line, rather than in looping turns.

Regional Qualifier Performance Benchmarks

Age
Developing
Below Avg
Avg
Above Avg
Excellent
Male 14-18.5 yrs
<5.09
6.01-8.10
9.01-11.04
11.05-14.09
>14.10
Male >18.5 yrs
<5.09
6.01-8.10
9.01-11.12
12.01-14.09
>14.10
Female 14-18.5 yrs
<2.01
2.02-6.06
6.07-8.10
9.01-13.03
>13.04
Female >18.5 yrs
<2.08
3.01-6.10
7.01-9.11
10.01-13.06
>13.07

National Final

The top 100 from across Canada will be invited to compete.

40/30M SPRINT

SPEED

40/30M SPRINT
The 40m sprint is a test to measure an athlete’s speed and sprinting ability. The athlete starts from a two-point stance, behind a first set of timing lights. The test begins as soon as the athlete breaks the laser between the first set of timing lights. The test measures an athlete’s time from 0-10m, 30-40m and 0-40m.

6 SECOND BIKE SPRINT

SPEED

6 SECOND BIKE SPRINT
Athletes pedal flat out for six seconds on a stationary bike while remaining seated. An ergometer measures the peak wattage achieved and a second calculation factors in the athlete’s weight to determine watts per kg. The 6 second bike sprint is a key test for speed skating, and the sprint disciplines in track cycling.

CONCEPT DYNO

STRENGTH

CONCEPT DYNO
The concept dyno is an exercise/piece of equipment used to test an athlete’s push/pull strength. On a seated machine resembling an indoor rower, athletes pull a bar to their chest as hard as they can. Athletes also perform a push movement to ascertain strength of both muscle groups. Athletes also perform a seated leg press to measure lower body strength. The concept dyno test employs the same muscle groups used in rowing and paddling sports.

SINGLE BROAD JUMP

POWER

SINGLE BROAD JUMP
From a standstill, the athlete jumps as far forward as possible landing with two feet. This movement is an important power test for all running-based sports, like rugby and athletics.

STANDING TRIPLE JUMP

POWER

STANDING TRIPLE JUMP
With both feet placed parallel, the athlete jumps consecutively forward three times. Like the single broad jump, it is a general test of power and indicator for acceleration.

ARM LEG BIKE

ENDURANCE

ARM LEG BIKE
This is an endurance test to measure aerobic capacity and an athlete’s ability to maintain power. On a stationary bike with moving arms, athletes must hit set revolutions per minute (RPM) targets. The test is over when the athlete is too exhausted to hit the set targets. Women start cycling at 50 RPM and men start at 60 RPM. This is a predictive endurance test for rowing and paddling.

Photos

2020 Partnering National Sport Federations

Providing 2nd phase testing to the selected Athletes.

Canadian Olympic and Paralympic Sport Institute / Sport Centre Network

Serving as the official delivery partner for RBC Training Ground across Canada.

Schedule

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Saturday, February 29, 2020
Kelowna
University of British Columbia
Qualifying
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Vancouver
University of British Columbia

Alberta

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Sunday, January 12, 2020
Calgary
University of Calgary
Qualifying
Sunday, March 22, 2020
Edmonton
University of Alberta

Manitoba

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Saturday, March 14, 2020
Winnipeg
University of Winnipeg

Saskatchewan

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Saturday, March 28, 2020
Saskatoon
University of Saskatchewan

Ontario

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Saturday, February 1, 2020
Ottawa
University of Ottawa
Qualifying
Saturday, February 8, 2020
Toronto
University of Toronto
Qualifying
Sunday, February 23, 2020
Hamilton
McMaster University

Québec

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Sunday, February 9, 2020
Québec
Laval University
Qualifying
Sunday, March 15, 2020
Montréal
Vanier College

ATLANTIC CANADA

Event
Date
City
Location
Results
Qualifying
Sunday, March 8, 2020
Halifax, N.S.
St. Mary's University
Qualifying
Sunday, March 22, 2020
Fredericton, N.B.
University of New Brunswick