World

Warnings issued as Midwest cleans up from deadly storms

People in the Midwest United States were bracing for more bad weather Monday, a day after severe thunderstorms and tornadoes left at least eight people dead in Iowa and Minnesota.

People in the Midwest United States were bracing for more bad weather Monday, a day after severe thunderstorms and tornadoes left at least eight people dead in Iowa and Minnesota.

The U.S. National Weather Service is warning that severe thunderstorms are likely in Kansas, with high winds, large hail and tornados possible. The band of bad weather extends farther east along the Mississippi River valley, forecasters say.

Sunday's storms hit hardest in the town of Parkersburg in central Iowa where a tornado formed, destroying a high school and several other buildings, local officials said.

Iowa Homeland Security administrator Dave Miller said five people were killed in Parkersburg and two others near the community of New Hartford. At least 50 injuries were reported.

Miller said state officials are assessing damage and that more fatalities and injuries are possible as reports come in from remote farms and rescuers comb through wreckage.

In neighbouring Minnesota, authorities say a two-year-old child is dead after severe thunderstorms with large hail and tornadoes hit the suburbs of the state capital, St. Paul. Nine other people were injured.

The U.S. South and Midwest have been hit by a number of severe storms this spring that have left dozens dead and injured, and destroyed hundreds of homes and buildings.

In Arkansas alone, 24 people have been killed in three separate incidents involving tornados and intense thunderstorms since February.

The U.S. tornado season runs until early summer with another high risk period for twisters in the fall.

With files from the Associated Press