World

United Nations' 70th anniversary marked with worldwide light show

More than 200 landmarks, from the Pyramids in Egypt to the Eiffel Tower in Paris, will be lit up in blue - the official colour of the United Nations - on Saturday to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the world body.

More than 200 landmarks bathed in blue light

The Great Wall of China is lit up in blue to mark the 70th anniversary of the United Nations. (Li Sanxian/Reuters)

More than 200 landmarks in 60 countries from the Pyramids in Egypt to the Eiffel Tower in Paris and the Empire State Building in New York will be lit up in blue — the official colour of the United Nations — on Saturday to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the world body.

The global celebration kicked off in New Zealand and then at the Sydney Opera House in Australia. It then moved across countries and continents to include the Great Wall of China. Others were to include the ancient city of Petra in Jordan, Russia's Hermitage Museum, the Alhambra in Spain and the statue of Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.

A visitor poses for a picture with the 'supertrees' at Singapore's gardens by the bay as the trees are lit in the blue hues of the United Nation's logo. The island city-state is also celebrating 50 years as a member of UN. (Joseph Nair/Associated Press)

New Yorkers actually got a sneak preview of the celebration because UN headquarters was lit up in blue Friday night as well.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed hope that "by turning the world UN blue for a day, we can light a way to a better tomorrow."

Oct. 24 is the anniversary of the entry into force of the UN Charter in 1945 and is celebrated as UN Day.

The General Assembly unanimously approved a declaration Friday reaffirming the faith of the 193 member states in the United Nations on its 70th anniversary and the UN's determination "to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war."

It says the UN charter unites all member states "in diversity beyond our differences of language, culture or religion, today as 70 years ago."

The secretary-general told the assembly that the UN over seven decades has brought "freedom to millions, dismantling colonialism, defeating apartheid and defending human rights for all, regardless of race, religion, nationality, gender or sexual orientation."

But he said "violence, poverty, ill-health and abuse plague far too many people, especially women and girls," and more people have fled their homes than at any time since the Second World War because of conflict, oppression and fear.

Nonetheless, Ban said, "without the United Nations, our world would be a far bleaker place."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now