World

Ukraine conflict: Government forces retreat from Debaltseve

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko says government forces have been pulled out of the railroad junction of Debaltseve, the epicentre of recent fierce fighting with separatist soldiers.

Ukrainian troops shown in footage being escorted along village road by rebels

Debaltseve retreat

8 years ago
Duration 2:47
Ukraine soldiers attacked by Russian rebels as they withdraw from town

After weeks of relentless fighting, the embattled Ukrainian rail hub of Debaltseve fell Wednesday to Russia-backed separatists, who hoisted a flag in triumph over the town. The Ukrainian president confirmed that he had ordered troops to pull out and the rebels reported taking hundreds of soldiers captive.


CBC News is there

CBC News correspondent Nahlah Ayed is in eastern Ukraine with producer Tracy Seeley and cameraman Richard Devey. Ayed sent this report Wednesday as Ukrainian soldiers retreated from Debaltseve.

At times on the road to Debaltseve, it was a parade of military vehicles and ambulances: tanks, armoured personnel carriers, trucks. We even saw a broken down APC being towed by another towards a Ukrainian base near Artyomovsk. The air is thick with the smell of heavy machinery.

Some of the soldiers were waving Ukrainian flags and pumping their fists in the air. Others looked more sombre. As did those who arrived at the Artyomovsk medical clinic, seemingly fresh from battle. But the shelling, sometimes sustained, was still going on, and some of the Ukrainian heavy hardware was actually travelling toward Debaltseve — suggesting some fighting was still going on. But clearly so far this is going the rebels' way.

— Nahlah Ayed


Some Ukrainian troops retreated with their weapons Wednesday morning from the town in eastern Ukraine, covered in dirt and looking exhausted, The Associated Press reported. Some were driving to the nearby town of Artyomovsk in trucks while several others, unshaven and visibly upset, were on foot.

One soldier spoke of heavy government losses, while another said they had not been able to get food or water because of the intense rebel shelling. A third spoke of hunkering down in bunkers for hours, unable to even go to the toilet because of the shelling. They smoked cigarettes in the frigid winter air and gratefully accepted plastic cups of tea given to them by locals.

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko (right) talks to servicemen in Artyomovsk on Wednesday after government forces pulled out of Debaltseve. (Mykhailo Palinchak/Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Reuters)

"We're very happy to be here," the hungry soldier told the AP. "We were praying all the time and already said goodbye to our lives a hundred times."

Reuters reported the Ukrainian top military command said 22 government soldiers had been killed in the Debaltseve over the past few days, while more than 150 were wounded.

Russian Channel One showed the rebels hoisting their flag over a high-rise building in Debaltseve. Russian state-owned television also showed images of several dozen captured Ukrainian troops being escorted along a village road by the rebels.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko sought to portray the withdrawal as a tactical decision that "laid shame on Russia." He denied reports of large Ukrainian casualties and rebel claims of many soldiers captured, saying troops were leaving Debaltseve with their weapons and ammunition. He said the army had withdrawn 80 percent of its troops from the town by Wednesday morning and two more columns had yet to leave.

"Debaltseve was under our control, it was never encircled. Our troops and formations have left in an organized and planned manner," he said in televised comments.

(CBC)

"The Ukrainian troops... gave a blow in the teeth to those who were trying to encircle them," Poroshenko said at a Kyiv airport as he traveled to eastern Ukraine to "shake the hands" of the soldiers leaving Debaltseve.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, on a visit Tuesday to Budapest, had urged Kyiv to admit defeat in the contested town, saying "the only choice" of the Ukrainian troops was to "leave behind weaponry, lay down arms and surrender."

Despite reports of Ukrainian forces giving up the fight for Debaltseve, rebel artillery and rocket fire were still being shot at the town at regular intervals Wednesday.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg accused the separatists of refusing to respect a cease-fire agreement and urged Russia "to end support for separatists and to withdraw forces and military equipment from eastern Ukraine." Russia has denied supplying the separatists with troops and weapons, a claim scoffed at by Western nations and Ukraine, who point to NATO satellite pictures of Russian weapons in eastern Ukraine.

The withdrawal from Debaltseve attracted fierce criticism from Ukrainian nationalist politicians as well as from the commanders of volunteer battalions fighting alongside government troops. Semyon Semenchenko, a battalion commander and a member of parliament, on Facebook accused the military command of betraying the country's interests in Debaltseve.

"We had enough forces and means," he said. "The problem is the command and coordination. They are as bad as can be."

RAW: Ukraine troops retreat from Debaltseve

8 years ago
Duration 1:22
Troops and vehicle head away from town under siege

The fierce fighting around Debaltseve, which links the two major separatist cities of Donetsk and Luhansk, had raged on despite a cease-fire deal brokered by European leaders which took effect Sunday.

Some retreating troops said Wednesday they had not received any reinforcements in Debaltseve from the government and had been walking for a whole day. One Ukrainian soldier who introduced himself only as Nikolai said he was not even sure if his unit was retreating or being rotated elsewhere.

"I don't know. Our commanders didn't tell us whether it's a retreat or just a rotation," he said. "They just told us to change our positions because our unit had been staying there for quite a long time and we had sustained quite big losses."

At a barricade outside the town of Vuhlehirsk, reporters were barred from the road into Debaltseve by a group of fighters. Some of the men identified themselves as coming from Russia's Far East and bore the typical Asiatic features of native people there.

Viktor Ponosov, a rebel commander at the checkpoint, said Ukrainian forces appeared to have run out of ammunition and food.

"We have heard that they are calling their relatives and friends from within the encirclement and saying to them: 'Please help us, because they are killing us and destroying us,"' Ponosov said.

The leaders of Russia, Ukraine, Germany and France who negotiated the cease-fire deal that was supposed to take effect Sunday, are expected to talk about its implementation later Wednesday.

Elsewhere in the conflict zone, rebel leaders said they had begun withdrawing heavy weaponry Wednesday from parts of the front line where the cease-fire was holding. Basurin told Russian Rossiya 1 channel that rebels were pulling back five self-propelled guns from Olenivka, south of the rebel stronghold of Donetsk, on the road to the government-controlled port of Mariupol.

"This is the first step," Basurin said. "We're not waiting for Ukraine to start pulling back the weaponry together with us."

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