World

Typhoon Nabi hits Japan, forces evacuation of 100,000

Typhoon Nabi lashed Japan and parts of South Korea, killing one person and injuring more than 40 others. Another 17 people were reported missing.

Over 100,000 people were told to flee their homes Tuesday as a typhoon hit southern Japan. Typhoon Nabi lashed Japan and parts of South Korea, killing one person and injuring more than 40 others. Another 17 people were reported missing.

A 75-year-old man died when his house was crushed by a landslide in Miyazaki on the southwestern main island of Kyushu. In South Korea, one man has been missing since he was swept away in a rising river in the southern city of Ulsan.

The eye of the storm made landfall at Isahaya near Nagasaki on the mountainous island of Kyushu. Kyushu is home to about 10 per cent of Japan's almost 130 million people.

The typhoon grounded hundreds of flights in Japan and South Korea, blocked trains and ferry services and closed down highways. Tens of thousands of travellers were stranded. Gale-driven waves flooded seaside towns.

More than 1,300 mm of rain fell in some parts of Kyushu in 24 hours. The typhoon was travelling at a slow pace of 30 km/h which meant more heavy rains were expected before it moves on.

Winds had weakened slightly but were gusting up to 126 km/h at the storm's centre.

The typhoon, named Nabi, meaning "butterfly" in Korean, was classified as a Category 3 storm. Forecasters expected it to weaken to a Category 1 over the next 24 hours.

In Busan, South Korea's second-largest city, strong winds blew down dozens of signboards, uprooted trees and toppled a 10-metre-high advertisement tower.

The term "typhoon" is used for storms occurring over the Northwest Pacific Ocean west of the international date line. "Hurricanes" take place in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Pacific Ocean east of the international date line.

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