World

Transport Canada helps track Gulf oil spill

With some of the best equipment and expertise for mapping and tracking the spreading oil slick, Transport Canada has been flying missions in the Gulf of Mexico twice a day, since the beginning of May.

 

With some of the best equipment and expertise for mapping and tracking the spreading oil slick, Transport Canada has been flying missions in the Gulf of Mexico twice a day, since the beginning of May.

The CBC's Paul Hunter was on hand to watch the Transport Canada team in action as they took photos and manned the observational and recording equipment. 

A Transport Canada plane awaits takeoff Monday on one of its twice-daily missions to help map the Gulf of Mexico oil slick. (Paul Hunter/CBC)
Transport Canada's Jan Skopicik looks for oil aboard a Transport Canada plane helping the U.S. Coast Guard map the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico. (Paul Hunter/CBC)
Jan Skopicik, of Transport Canada, photographs part of the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico. (Paul Hunter/CBC)
The oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico, near where the Deepwater Horizon exploded and sank in April, can be clearly seen from a Transport Canada plane on May 10. (Paul Hunter/CBC)
A wider view of the Gulf of Mexico shows an oily blob marking the location where the Deepwater Horizon exploded and sank. The photo was taken Monday from a Transport Canada plane. (Paul Hunter/CBC)
Transport Canada's Scott Payment records data in a plane above the Gulf of Mexico. The data is being used to map the oil slick. (Paul Hunter/CBC)