World·Video

Tiger befriends goat at Russian safari park

A bromance has developed between a rare Amur tiger and a goat that was intended to be his meal at Pirmorsky safari park in Russia.

Rare Amur tiger usually dines on live goats and rabbits without a care, twice a week, park staff say

Rare Amur tiger develops 'bromance' with goat originally intended to be its meal. 1:04

A bromance has developed between a rare Amur tiger and a goat that was intended to be his meal at Pirmorsky safari park in Russia.

The goat that has been named Timur in honour of his bravery in facing his predator, has been observed for several days frolicking in the snow with his newfound friend.

Timur is sleeping at the spot inside the Amur tiger's shelter where the large cat previously rested. The Amur tiger has now taken to resting on top of the shelter, guarding his friend.

Safari park staff have expressed surprise at the friendship on their website, saying the tiger usually dines on live goats and rabbits without a care, twice a week.

Avoid bloody ending

The Primorsky safari park runs a program for breeding rare tigers in captivity partly to give the large animal the chance to hunt his prey. The Amur tiger's affection for Timur the goat is highly unusual after three years of hunting other goats.

Timur appears to think the Amur tiger is his leader, chasing and following it at every turn.

The two animals are fed every day in the hope of helping the friendship continue and to avoid a bloody ending.

The safari park now posts daily updates of the friendship, saying the tiger "hisses" to warn off workers from approaching too closely to Timur.

The pair have been dubbed "the cautious Amur and the brave Timur" by fans.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.