Boys were only meant to stay 1 hour in Thai cave, but then the rains came

The 12 young soccer players and their coach who were rescued from a cave in Thailand only intended to stay in the underground complex for an hour, but they had to move further into the cave once it flooded, according to the father of one of the boys.

Teen's father says rescued soccer team members will enter monkhood to pay tribute to diver who died

Members of the Wild Boars soccer team became trapped inside the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex on June 23. Nine days later, divers found all 12 boys and their coach huddled together on a sandy slope, four kilometres from the cave's entrance. (Thai Navy Seal via AP)

The boys planned to explore the cave for just an hour, a casual jaunt to relax after soccer practice, but the waters rose.

The teammates climbed higher, using their hands to feel the walls for a crawl space that would lead to safer, higher ground. Those handprints were among the first signs of where the boys were, what they had done to escape the floods, and what dangers rescuers would face in their mission to save the boys and their coach.

The now-recuperating boys and the rescuers who brought them to safety are starting to share stories of the dangers and their survival. The hospital in northern Thailand where the 12 boys and their soccer coach are quarantined said Friday they are basically healthy, aside from some minor infections. A psychiatrist said their mental state seems fine.

Family members, first able to reunite with them only through a glass window, now can meet face to face though still not touch, to ensure any illnesses don't spread.

Banphot Konkum, father of 13-year-old Duangpetch Promthep, told The Associated Press his son — better known by his nickname, Dom — said the team members didn't know rain had started falling after they had entered the cave on June 23. But the rain caused flooding in the cave, blocking them from exiting.

'Water flow was strong'

"After an hour when they wanted to leave, the water level was rising. They ran further inside the cave to escape from the water. The water flow was strong," said Banphot.

In their search for a safe haven, the boys were reported to have used their hands to feel the walls for an opening to take them to a higher, safer spot. Searchers later found what they thought were the boys' handprints, giving them confidence the boys were alive and that the searchers were on the right path.

Rescuers are seen on July 11 transporting one of the boys from the cave in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, in northern Thailand. (Thai NavySEAL Facebook Page via AP)

"They, all 13 of them, saw a small passage or a crawl space, so they all dug the hole to get through to another spot, until they found Nen Nom Sao," Banphot said, referring to the sandy slope on which they ended up sheltering. There was nowhere else to go.

Dom's grandmother, Kameay Promthep, said she would tell Dom never to go near the cave or water again because she doesn't want anything to happen to him or for him to cause trouble to others again.

"I will tell Dom that he has to thank all the Thai people from all over the country and people from all over the world who were kind enough to come and help Dom. Without the [Thai navy] SEALs, the officials, and everyone who came and helped, Dom wouldn't be here today. He would not be seeing his Grandma, and Grandma wouldn't see his face again. From now on, Dom will have to be a good person."

Banphot said all 13 rescued team members will enter the monkhood to pay tribute to Saman Kunan, a former Thai navy SEAL who died while diving to place essential supplies along the rescue route. Becoming a monk at a temple for at least a short period is a way of making merit in Thai Buddhist tradition.

After the first three nights with no food in the cave, my son felt extreme hunger and cried.- Aikhan ​Wiboonrungruang

"We are planning the date and will do it whenever all the families are all ready," said Banphot.

The mother of the youngest Wild Boar teammate, 11-year old Chanin Wiboonrungruang, told a Bangkok newspaper that her son told her the team did not make a special point of bringing along food since they were only planning a short trek into the cave.

"After the first three nights with no food in the cave, my son felt extreme hunger and cried," Aikhan Wiboonrungruang told the Bangkok Post. "He had to rely only on water dripping from the rock. It was very cold at night and pitch dark. They had to lie huddled together.

Meditation to ease hunger

She said her son, nicknamed Tun, said the boys' 25-year-old soccer coach Ekapol (Ake) Chanthawong, told them to meditate to ease their hunger and save their energy.

One of the two British divers who found the group said the rescue operation was "completely uncharted, unprecedented territory," and that he had not been certain the boys would be found alive.

Banphot Konkum, father of Duangpetch Promthep, one of the rescued Thai boys, shows his son's soccer jersey during an interview at their home in Mae Sai district in northern Thailand on Friday. (Vincent Thian/Associated Press)

"Nothing like this has been done," Rick Stanton said at a news conference Friday at London's Heathrow airport after returning from Thailand.

Recalling the moment on July 2 when he and his diving partner John Volanthen found the boys on their 10th day inside the cave, he said his initial reaction was "of course, excitement, relief that they were still alive."

'Unbelievable,' says U.K. diver

"As they were coming down the slope, we were counting them till we got to 13. Unbelievable," he said. "They looked in good health, but of course when we departed all we could think about was how we were going to get them out. And so there was relief tempered with uncertainty."

The British divers who blazed the trail were praised by Australian doctor-diver Richard Harris, who stayed in the cave for three days to oversee the medical care of the boys while they were waiting to be rescued.

"Rick and John not only found the children and coach alive, but conveyed the gravity of the situation to the rest of the world and thus the rescue started in earnest," he wrote on his Facebook page on Friday, as he was flying home on an Australian air force plane with his countrymen who also worked at the cave. "The 4 Brits then did further supply dives to the soccer players, the coach and the four Thai Navy Seals which allowed them to prepare and sustain themselves for the rescue ultimately."

Thai authorities had contacted the British Cave Rescue Council for help when the boys disappeared. The British divers left London on June 26 with special rescue equipment, including radios designed to work in caves.

An international team of cave divers and Thai navy SEALs extracted the 12 boys and coach in a high-risk, three-day mission that concluded Tuesday.

Boys shown in quarantine, but all in good spirits as families look on 1:12

"None of the tasks were easy," Thai navy SEAL commander Rear Adm. Arpakorn Yookongkaew said Thursday after his men flew back to their base at Sattahip on the Gulf of Thailand.

"We were working on many tasks and we had to plan well. Our troops were taking risks, working in dangerous conditions and risking their lives. Many had to go to hospitals after the dives and many were sick. But we didn't mention it because it could affect morale."

An honour guard holds up a picture of Samarn Kunan, 38, who died during rescue preparations. He had been placing air tanks along the route the boys took after entering the cave complex. (Panumas Sanguanwong/Reuters)

Harris also acknowledged the contribution of the many who were not directly involved with the diving operations, "swarms of men and women" from Thailand and the international community who provided "everything from catering, communications, media and of course the huge teams of workers filling the cave with tonnes and tonnes of equipment to try and lower the water and sustain the diving operations."

"I have never seen anything like it with man battling to control the natural forces of the monsoon waters. Local climbing and rope access workers rigged the dry cave section for that part of the rescue and scoured the bush for more entrances to the cave. Drilling teams attempted to get through nearly a kilometre of rock to the boy's location. And all this time 4 brave Navy Seals sat with the Wild Boars knowing they were in as much danger as the kids."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.