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Suspect in Glasgow airport attack unlikely to survive: doctor

A man accused of crashing a flaming sports utility vehicle into Scotland's busiest airport in a failed attack is unlikely to survive his severe burns, a doctor who treated him said Tuesday.

A man accused of crashinga flamingsports utility vehicleinto Scotland's busiest airport in a failed attack is unlikely to survive his severe burns, a doctor who treated him said Tuesday.

Kafeel Ahmed, 27, was allegedly inside a Jeep Cherokee filled with gas canisters that smashed into security barriers at Glasgow airport's main terminal on June 30, in anincident that police say was linked totwo unexploded car bombs found a day earlierin central London.

The aeronautical engineer from India has third-degree burns covering most of his torso and limbs, a member of the medical team that treated him said on condition of anonymity because patients' details are confidential.

"The prognosis is not good and he is not likely to survive," the doctor told the Associated Press. "It is beyond repair and because he has lost so much skin, he is now vulnerable to infection and won't be able to fight it."

Ahmed, who is under constant armed police guard at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, is among eight people who have been arrested in the alleged plot. Seven of the suspects are doctors or medical students.

"The patient remains in police custody and his condition remains critical," was all a spokeswoman for the Greater Glasgow Health Board would say. She spokeon the condition of anonymity, which isScottish government practice.

A police spokeswoman would not confirm whether Ahmed had been questioned.

Ahmed was initially treated at the Glasgow-area Royal Alexandra Hospital. The hospital is where the only suspect to have been charged in the alleged plot worked: Bilal Abdullah was charged late last week with conspiracy to cause explosions.

Prosecutors suspect Abdullah, a 27-year-old doctor born in Britain and raised in Iraq, and Ahmed of carrying out the attempted car bombings in London before attacking the Scottish airport.

Officials in India confirmed Ahmed had worked from December 2005 to August 2006 for Infotech Enterprises, a large outsourcing company contracted by the biggest names in aviation, such as Boeing and Airbus.

With files from the Associated Press